Posts Tagged ‘animated’

Photos of Famous Cartoon Characters in Minimalist LEGO Form

German ad agency Jung von Matt created this brilliant series of photographs for a LEGO advertising campaign titled “Imagine”. The images show famous characters from children’s television shows in simplified LEGO form. Can you figure out each of the shows?
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Protobooth: A Photobooth That Shoots 3D Animated GIFs

Protobooth is a creative photobooth by design firm Digital Kitchen that captures 3D photos rather than static images. Comprising 3 Canon 5D Mark II DSLRs, 4 Macbook Pros, and some fancy software mojo, the Protobooth simultaneously captures three photos at the push of a button, saves them to a networked hard drive, stitches them using Automator, applies a Photoshop filter action to the image, and then saves it as a GIF.
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A Brief History of the Animated GIF

PBS art series Off Book created this short video that presents a brief history of the animated GIF:

GIFs are one of the oldest image formats used on the web. Throughout their history, they have served a huge variety of purposes, from functional to entertainment. Now, 25 years after the first GIF was created, they are experiencing an explosion of interest and innovation that is pushing them into the terrain of art. In this episode of Off Book, we chart their history, explore the hotbed of GIF creativity on Tumblr, and talk to two teams of GIF artists who are evolving the form into powerful new visual experiences.

(via PBS Off Book via PopPhoto)

Learn Your Rights as a Photographer with this Short and Sweet Cartoon

Want to inform someone of their right to take pictures in the US? Just share this short cartoon created by the ACLU, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and The Gregory Brothers. It features Benjamin Franklin’s ghost, who sings about the various things you’re legally allowed to do without being harassed by law enforcement.

(via Gizmodo)

Stereogranimator: Create Your Own 3D Photos Using Vintage Stereographs

The New York Public Library has a massive collection of over 40,000 vintage stereographs (two photos taken from slightly different points of view). To properly share them with the world in 3D, the library has launched a new tool called the Stereogranimator. It lets you convert an old stereograph into either an animated 3D GIF (which uses “wiggle stereoscopy“) or an anaglyph (the kind that requires special glasses).
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Fascinating Stop-Motion Video Made with Simple Shapes and Creativity

Here’s a simple yet brilliant stop-motion video showing a person sitting at a table plays with shapes. Instead of computer-trickery, cleverly captured still photographs were used to bring the simple materials to life. It was created by animator Steven Briand while he was doing a two-month internship at Partizan.

(via PictureCorrect)

Still Photos with a Dash of Movement

Photographer Jamie Beck has a beautiful series of images that she calls “cinemagraphs“. They’re animated GIFs in which only a small piece each photograph is animated, making them a neat fusion of still and moving images. It’s amazing how much a tiny bit of movement in a still photo can do. They’re almost like the moving pictures you see in Harry Potter!
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Advertisement Drawn and Animated Entirely in Photoshop

This advertisement might not seem too special or difficult to do at first glance, until you find out that it was done completely in Photoshop.

Our original plan: traditional animation in flash, still art in illustrator. Boy did that change. As we went through look development, everyone was feeling the wonkier hand drawn feel. Goodbye Illustrator. As we talked through the pipeline process with our new animator buddy Ben, he suggests “just do it ALL in Photoshop”. With a flurry of keystrokes, the animation timeline was opened, and we were animating… right there… all in one program. ZOMG. [#]

Did you know that Photoshop is capable of animation? Check out the Window->Animation panel.

(via John Nack)

Seamless One World Portrait by Jock McDonald

Jock McDonald is a San Francisco-based photographer that has travelled the world, photographing people of different ages and cultures. He recently teamed up with animator Paul Blain to transform his black-and-white portraits spanning decades into a single 17-minute long video. The twist is that the transitions between faces are seamless using morphing, resulting in what feels like a single, dynamic portrait of the world.

If you’d like to try and create a similar video with portraits you’ve taken, there are free programs that can help you do so.

(via Lens Culture)