Posts Tagged ‘androidcamera’

Nikon Gives Android-Powered Compacts Another Shot with the Coolpix S810c

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It’s been almost 2 years since Nikon released its last Android-powered point-and-shoot, the S800c, and the camera giant is giving it another shot with the S810c, a followup that seeks to improve on many of the S800c’s flaws. Read more…

Google Working to Bring RAW Capability to Android Phones

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Given the incredibly positive response Nokia got from the photo community when it announced that Lumia phones would soon be able to capture images in DNG RAW, it makes sense that operating systems other than Windows Phone would soon follow suit. Lo and behold, it seems Google is on the cusp of just such an announcement itself. Read more…

Voice Shutter Now Available for Android Phones Running CyanogenMod

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CyanogenMod is sort of like Magic Lantern for Android phones. It’s an open source, replacement firmware option for people who want to get more out of certain Android devices. And the most recent update targets the photographic community — in a hands-free sort of way. Read more…

Polaroid Unleashes the Android-Powered iM1836

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After a substantial leak in mid-December, we expected that Polaroid would unveil its android-powered J2 (or is it J3 now?) look-alike at CES. And here it is, officially announced in all its pre-production glory alongside a few other, less-impressive products. Read more…

Samsung and Panasonic Considering Android-Powered Cameras

Back in January, Polaroid unveiled its SC1630 Smart Camera that’s powered with Google’s Android operating system. Now, more manufacturers may be gearing up to have the popular smartphone OS built into their cameras: Samsung and Panasonic are both reportedly exploring this idea. Regarding what this means for consumers, Engadget writes,

It could be a major breakthrough from a usability standpoint, opening up the in-camera ecosystem to third-party developers. We could see Twitter and Facebook apps that let you not only publish your photos directly with a familiar interface, but also see photos shared by your friends. A capacitive touchscreen would let you type in comments directly as well. You could publish to web-based services, utilize apps that enable post-capture creativity or receive firmware updates directly over WiFi. That hotshoe or USB port could accommodate a variety of different accessories, like a microphone or 4G modem that could be used with several models, including those from other manufacturers.

One potential downside to having an Android-powered camera may be stability — imagine having to regularly reboot your frozen camera.

(via Engadget & Ubergizmo)


Image credit: Samsung NX10 camera by liewcf