Posts Tagged ‘alternative’

Yahoo Engineer Leaves to Build an Open Flickr Alternative

OpenPhoto is a new “open” alternative to Flickr being built by programmer Jaisen Mathai — an engineer who quit his job at Yahoo (Flickr’s owner) back in May 2011. Instead of storing images using company servers, this new service will allow users to connect their own online storage accounts to store their data within arms reach. This would be like using Flickr to share your images while having the photos themselves be stored in a location that you control (e.g. Amazon S3, Dropbox, etc…).

Mathai is planning to have an open source version of the software that anyone can install on their own servers, and also a hosted version of the software, much like WordPress.org and WordPress.com for blogging. He’s currently raising money for the project through Kickstarter, and plans to launch the hosted version of the service by September.

OpenPhoto (via TechCrunch)

Pixlr is a Free and Powerful Browser-Based Photoshop Clone

This has been around for a while already, so many of you have probably seen it, but I just started playing around with it today and was so impressed that I had to share it here. Pixlr is a browser-based Flash application for image editing that resembles Photoshop in both features and functionality. If you’re familiar with Photoshop, then you should have no trouble picking up Pixlr, which is great for situations where you’re on a computer that doesn’t have Photoshop installed.

Try it out and let us know what you think!

Hip Camera Holsters Batman Would Approve Of

Apparently, there are plenty of people who find a traditional camera strap to be a (pardon the pun) pain in the neck.

Italian company CPtech recently announced a camera holster design, the B-grip. It’s a strap-free contraption screws in to the camera body like a tripod head, and then is clipped into a holster for a belt — a utility belt, perhaps?

The whole idea is that the camera can be quickly released or carried securely against the photographer’s body. The B-grip will run you about $50.

The B-grip will probably create some competition for Shai Gear’s similar belt holster, the Spider Holster, which looks and sounds more like a Bruce Wayne-Peter Parker collaboration. Unlike the B-grip, the Spider Holster doesn’t actually clip in; it slides in and out for easy access.

The Spider Holster has been out for about a year now and costs about $110 — if they’re in stock.

Personally, I don’t trust my butterfingers with a strapless camera; I usually wrap the strap around my hand several times if it’s not around my neck or shoulder.

What are your thoughts? Are you a strap-free daredevil or are you a seasoned strap-manager?