Posts Tagged ‘ai’

How Humans Are Teaching Computers To See and Understand Photos

Three year old children can make sense of what they see in photos and describe them to us, but even the most advanced computers have historically had difficulties with that same task. That’s quickly changing though, as computer scientists are developing powerful new ways to have computers identify what a photograph is showing.

The video above is a new TED talk given by Fei-Fei Li, a Stanford professor who’s one of the world’s leading experts on computer vision. She talks about her revolutionary ImageNet project that has changed how computers “see.”
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An Algorithm That Can Distinguish Beautiful Portraits From Ugly Ones

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Could machines be trained to tell the difference between a beautiful portrait photo and a not-so-pleasing one? Beauty is pretty subjective, but scientists are trying to boil down the common properties of beautiful digital portrait photos so that a computer can be trained to spot them. Along the way, they’re revealing interesting new things about what people look for in portraits.
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Selfie Bots: Students Create Robot Snappers That Use Sight and Sound

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Cornell offers a course on designing with microcontrollers, and this year’s final project submissions featured a couple of groups who decided to build robotic photographers that help capture selfies.
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Google is Developing a Photo Recognition Program That Can Describe Exactly What’s in Your Photos

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Scientists at Google Research and Stanford University have teamed up to develop an artificial intelligence program designed to automatically produce captions based on the content of the image.

That’s right, not just tags, full on captions like “A person riding a motorcycle on a dirt road.” Read more…

Canon Patent Suggests Feature That Would Choose Between JPEG and RAW For You

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In the future, “Auto” may be an option for choosing between JPEG and RAW on Canon DSLRs. A recently published patent reveals that the company has tinkered with the idea of a feature that could automatically choose which photos to save in RAW and which ones to save as JPEG only.
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How Artificial Intelligence Reconstructs Our Minds and Lives Using Our Photos

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Data is embedded in our environment, in our behavior, and in our genes. Over the past two years, the world has generated 90% of all the data we have today. The information has always been there, but now we can extract and collect massive amounts of it.

Given the explosion of mobile photography, social media based photo sharing, and video streaming, it’s likely that a large portion of the data we collect and create comes in the form of digital images. Read more…

photoBot: A Photog Robot That Scans the Room for Pictures, R2-D2-Style

photoBot is a new photography robot designed by Tommy Dykes, a designer and PhD student at Northumbria University. It constantly scans a room for photo ops by turning its head in a manner reminiscent of R2-D2 from Star Wars (which, in case you haven’t heard, is now owned by Disney).
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Location Recognition for Photographs by Looking at Architecture

Cameras these days are smart enough to recognize the faces found inside photographs and label them with names. What if the same kind of recognition could be done for the locations of photographs? What if, instead of using satellite geodata, the camera could simply recognize where it is by the contents of the photographs?

That’s what research being done at Carnegie Mellon University and INRIA/Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris may one day lead to. A group of researchers have created a computer program that can identify the distinctive architectural elements of major cities by processing street-level photos.
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Researchers Create Program That Can Quantify How Fake Photos Are

What if all advertising photos came with a number that revealed the degree to which they were Photoshopped? We might not be very far off, especially with recent advertising controversies and efforts to get “anti-Photoshop laws” passed. Researchers Hany Farid and Eric Kee at Dartmouth have developed a software tool that detects how much fashion and beauty photos have been altered compared to the original image, grading each photo on a scale of 1-5. The program may eventually be used as a tool for regulation: both publications and models could require that retouchers stay within a certain threshold when editing images.

(via Dartmouth via NYTimes)

Computer Trained to Select the Best Candid Portrait Photos from Videos

Here’s the current state of imagery: still cameras can shoot HD video, video cameras can capture high quality stills, and data storage costs continue to fall. In the future, it might become commonplace for people to make photos by shooting uber-high quality video and then selecting the best still. However, as any photographer knows, selecting the best photograph from a series of photos captured in burst mode is already a challenge, so selecting a still from 30fps footage would be quite a daunting challenge.

To make the future easier for us humans, researchers at Adobe and the University of Washington are working on training computers to do the grunt work for us. One research project currently being done involves training a computer to automatically select candid portraits when given video of a person. The video above is a demo of the artificial intelligence in action.

Candid Portrait Selection From Video (via John Nack)