Posts Tagged ‘advice’

Veteran Street Photographer Offers Some No-BS Advice on How to Get Better

LA-based documentary and street photographer John Free has been practicing and teaching street photography for over 30 years. He’s taught workshops in LA, New York, Paris and London, and his work has appeared in Newsweek, Smithsonian, US News and World Report and more.

In other words, he has many years worth of experience to offer (which is probably why he teaches workshops), and in the short YouTube video above he makes a little bit of his knowledge available for free. Read more…

6 Tips for Effectively Shooting Behind The Scenes

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In my experience there seems to be a common misconception that shooting production photography and behind the scenes videos/documentaries are an easy task. While it’s true that these sometimes don’t require the normal spit and polish, photographers are used to, especially in terms of video work, I can assure you they’re no walk in the park.

As is the case any time you’re working around high level talent, or even low level talent for that matter, there’s still plenty that could go wrong. A lesson I quickly found out as I started shooting behind the scenes videos a few years ago.
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I’m Sorry; It’s Just Our Policy

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You probably wouldn’t know it by looking at me, but I belong to a gym.

It’s not the fanciest gym on the planet, but it’s reasonably nice and the only gym in town that also has an indoor and outdoor pool. And a big glass water dispenser at the front desk with lemons in it. I’m a sucker for a nice water dispenser. My husband and I joined the gym years ago, stopped for awhile, and then rejoined with our children.
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10 Bogus Excuses People Use When They Steal Photos from the Web

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So you think you have a good reason or excuse to use a photo you found on the Internet without asking the photographer who took it? Let’s see if it can stand the test.
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When Perfect Isn’t Perfect or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Blur

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Quite a few years ago I took a solo trip down to Key West, FL. It was the first time I had gone on a vacation by myself, and since I was free of the distraction of friends and family, I decided it would make a great opportunity to expand upon my photography skills.

You see, the trip was shortly after I had decided to take this whole photography hobby of mine seriously. I had worked with video for years but now I wanted to work on becoming a good photographer as well, not just one that took as many photos as possible and then looked for the three good ones out of the hundreds shot (seriously, it’s a horrible method and I wouldn’t recommend it to anybody).
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The Snowball Effect: Transitioning from a Hobbyist to a Full Time Photographer

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I started getting into photography when I was in my mid-to-late teens. I bought a 35mm Minolta XG7 at a local yard sale during my freshman year, and around the same time I took a 3 week summer darkroom course at a local community college. I got really in to it, but when I finally finished high school I went straight into the workforce. I jumped around various manual labor and retail jobs until I was 21. This is when I got married, and shortly thereafter I began considering the distant possibility of making a career out of my hobby.
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Confessions of an Ex-Gear Addict

How buying cameras and lenses made me miserable and lose thousands, and how you too can overcome Gear Acquisition Syndrome

Jul 12, 2013 · Olivier Duong

4 Things to Consider When Making Time-Lapse Photographs

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It seems the perfect storm of affordable cameras, constant updates in technology, and adventurous artists has hit us and brought with it a large wave of time lapses. I’m not sure when time lapses really became as popular as they are right now but they show no sign of slowing down anytime soon.
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The Best Advice I Ever Received: ‘Put Down the D*mn Camera’

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My mentor was a cranky dude. He liked to put me through my paces every chance he got. Sometimes, when he needed something: “Hey, Greg—fetch that cable for me!” Yes, he said “fetch.” Sometimes, when he just knew better than I did: “Hey, Greg — get off your a** and come assist me.” Or when I was feeling superior: “Hey, Greg—stop being an idiot.”

Ah, fond memories!
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Why Picky Clients are a Good Thing

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A new client walked into my studio with her three little children, the eldest of which had a session. The little girl was all dressed-up, but very traditionally, so after conferring with mom, we began the session. And it was one of those sessions where everything went right. Happy child, great expressions, and yet, mom was hovering, straightening an already straight bow, smoothing invisible wrinkles in her daughter’s tights, “fixing” tiny details, some of which weren’t even in the frame.
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