Posts Tagged ‘advice’

Crappy Gear, Amazing Photos: Using An Old Canon PowerShot to Capture Dreamy Landscapes

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I didn’t really get into photography until my son was born. Like most new parents, one of the first things I did was go out and buy a camera so I could document every minute. As I started taking more pictures, my vision expanded and I began to start looking at things differently.
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Peter Hurley Shows How He Helps Portrait Subjects Relax in Front of His Camera

PopPhoto recently paid a visit to the New York portrait studio of photographer Peter Hurley, who shared some advice on how to shoot better portraits of people by making them feel comfortable and confident in front of the camera. “Headshots are 10 percent photography and 90 percent communication,” Hurley says.

(via PopPhoto via SLR Lounge]

This is Why You Shouldn’t Check Your Camera Gear In When Flying

It’s often recommended that photographers keep their gear with them when flying rather than checking it in. If the risk of theft and careless baggage handlers aren’t enough to deter you, check out the video above. It shows one particular baggage pusher system that’s used in an international airport to direct bags onto conveyor belts. As you can see, gentle handling isn’t exactly the goal.

(via 01Bowfin via Reddit)

10 Mistakes People Make When Buying a Camera

Outdoor and travel photographer John Greengo has spent years behind the counter of a camera store, helping people with their camera purchases. In this 8-minute talk, Greengo shares 10 of the biggest and most common mistakes he sees people making when shopping for a new camera.
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The Social Engineering of Photography: Overcoming the Challenge of Talking to People

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I’m always on the lookout for potential subjects. Approaching them is something that I’ve actually gotten better at, despite the video evidence below to the contrary. When I was in college working for Student Media I hated talking to people to get caption information after I photographed them. Approaching a person before the photograph was even harder.

As I became more confident in my ability it became easier, but it was still difficult for me. When I decided I wanted to be a full time photographer, I knew I needed to do my best to remove the apprehension of talking to people I didn’t know about photographing them. I knew that working assignments would mean talking to people I’ve never met a lot.
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Don’t Let the Fear of Failure Cripple Your Growth as a Photographer

Here are some encouraging words from photographer and educator Mike Browne, who talks about one of the biggest obstacles some photographers face: the feature of failure and getting it “wrong.”

“Many photographers don’t get into action because they are afraid they might get it wrong,” Browne writes. “Instead they do endless research, read, watch videos and tell themselves they just need to know a little more before they attempt it themselves. To master photography or anything else in life there is some knowledge needed – and a lot of practice and experimentation.”

Buying or Selling Used Gear on Craigslist? Arrange the Meetup at a Police Station

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If you’re planning on buying or selling some camera gear with the help of Craigslist, here’s a simple tip: the lobby of your local police station is a safe place to arrange the meeting with the stranger.
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A Look at Composition in Documentary Photography

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In my mind, there are three important elements of a photograph. Lighting, Composition and Moment. Every picture that I love has these elements, in varying amounts. A great picture may have strength in all three areas, or it may be, for example, such an emotional moment that it overpowers poor composition or light.

But for this article I want to take a quick look at composition, and how photographers will be subconsciously considering many compositional elements when making pictures as well as editing and post processing later.
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3 Simple Pointers for Avoiding Awkward Poses When Shooting Portraits of Couples

Some couples are naturals when it comes to posing gracefully for the camera, while others may be more awkward and require more guidance from the photographer. Here’s a short video in which wedding photographer Jasmine Star shares 3 simple but helpful tips she’s learned over the years for helping create natural moments between couples. She suggests that you should focus on: (1) touch, (2) appendages, and (3) physical tension.

“These are relatively easy tips,” Star writes, “but they make the biggest difference when it comes to putting clients as ease as well as getting photos that appeal to a soft and natural photo style.”

(via Jasmine Star via ISO 1200)

Go Pro? Maybe What You Need is to Go Amateur

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Photography is one of the most popular hobbies on the planet, but you’d never know it by reading most photography blogs, podcasts, books, and tutorials. It’s treated as a profession, where the goal is making money, buying more expensive gear or getting your prints into galleries around the world. You’re being enticed to “Go Pro,” and that’s just not realistic for the vast majority of photographers. Most photographers could benefit from going amateur.
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