Posts Tagged ‘adapter’

Using a Radioactive WWII Bomber Lens on a DSLR with a 3D-Printed Adapter

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Originally produced for the US military in WW2, the Kodak Aero Ektar 178mm f/2.5 is a large-format monster of a lens. Mounted in bombers, facing down at Europe, this lens was sold to the US government for the price of a family car. It found its way into military surplus after the war, and was widely used in journalism and by professional photographers.
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Make a DIY Filter Adapter for Your Lens Using a Large Sponge

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A few years ago, photographer Samuel Chapman of The Rocket Factory found himself with an annoying problem on his hands. After purchasing a number of neutral density filters for his DSLR, he found that Nikon’s $2,000 14-24mm lens didn’t have any good way of being used with a filter.

He had already paid hundreds of dollars each for his fancy filters, so he decided to make a makeshift adapter for the 14-24mm lens… using a sponge. The result is a product Chapman calls the “FX Sponge Filter Holder 5000.”
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Luxi is a Clip-On Adapter That Transforms Your iPhone Into a Proper Light Meter

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Back in March 2011, we featured an iPhone app that lets you use your iPhone as a makeshift light meter. The app apparently works pretty well, but if you’ve been looking for a fancier solution involving your iPhone, one has finally arrived.

It’s called the Luxi, and is a small clip on accessory that turns your iPhone into a proper light meter.
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Initial Metabones Speed Booster Adapter Reviews Are Positive

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When we first shared the news that Metabones had announced a “speed booster” adapter that makes your lenses faster, wider and sharper, not a lot of people had gotten their hands on it yet. But now that the most exciting accessory on the block has been accepted as definitely NOT an elaborate April Fools joke, a few websites have taken turns with it, and initial reviews all seem to be positive. Read more…

Metabones Speed Booster Adapter Makes Your Lenses Faster, Wider and Sharper

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If you read the title and thought “huh?” you’re not the only one. Hearing that an adapter can actually make your lenses faster and wider sounds a bit like photography science fiction, but it’s true and it’s getting some serious attention online — it’s Metabones’ new Speed Booster. Read more…

CamRanger: Wirelessly Control Canon and Nikon DSLRs with an iOS Device

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Wireless adapters for digital cameras can be very pricey accessories, especially when you’re dealing with high-end DSLRs. Manufacturers can squeeze more money out of those who pay thousands for a camera by charging hundreds for an adapter, even though a cheaper one could work just fine. What’s more, the adapters are often designed specifically for certain cameras, making them useless if you change models or makes.

CamRanger is a new device that’s designed to solve all those inconveniences. It’s a standalone wireless adapter that connects to Canon and Nikon DSLRs using an ordinary USB cable.
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Olympus Apparently Working on a FT-to-MFT Adapter with Built-In AF and IS

Olympus currently offers a $144 adapter called the MMF-2 for photographers who want to use an existing collection of Four Thirds-mount lenses on a Micro Four Thirds camera. The accessory makes the lenses mountable and acts as a middleman between the lenses and the cameras, but its features pretty much end there. It appears that Olympus is working on a much fancier adapter: one that actually contains lens elements and contains focusing/stabilization features as well.
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Nikon Announces a 1 Series Digiscoping Adapter for Using Telescopes as Lenses

Digiscoping is when a photographer attaches an optical telescope to a digital camera and uses it as a super-telephoto lens. Although the image quality isn’t as good as an actual camera lens with the same focal length, it’s a much cheaper option for people who already own high-powered telescopes — bird photographers, for example. Nikon is no stranger to the digiscoping game, having released adapters for its DSLRs and compact cameras, but today it announced new accessories that bring digiscoping to the 1 Series mirrorless lineup.
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Want Cheap Glass? Buy a Vintage Lens and an Adapter

If you want a 50mm f/1.4 lens for your DSLR, you’ll need to shell out at least a couple hundred bucks, even if you buy one made by a third-party manufacturer. For those of you who don’t mind losing autofocus, you can get the same focal lengths and apertures for much cheaper by buying some old glass and an adapter. By much cheaper, we mean as low as $10-$20! India-based photographer Brock Whittaker recently did this after seeing an auction on eBay for an old Mamiya camera kit.
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Fujifilm M-Mount Adapter Gives Leica Shooters a Cheaper Option for Digital

There are already options available for those people who want to use Leica lenses with their Fujifilm X-Pro1, but for those of you who prefer to use only equipment from your camera manufacturer themselves, you now have that option as well. The new M-Mount adapter from Fujifilm, priced at $199, will be available sometime in June and brings with it compatibility with Leica’s wide range of high-end M Lenses. Fuji will also be releasing a firmware update alongside the M-Mount adapter in order to maximize compatibility with Leica lenses. The adapter and the lenses it “adapts” for don’t come cheap (then again neither does the X-Pro1), but if you’ve been wanting to shoot digital images with Leica lenses without a pricey Leica digital rangefinder, this option is certainly attractive.

(via Fujifilm)