Posts Tagged ‘adapter’

CamRanger: Wirelessly Control Canon and Nikon DSLRs with an iOS Device

camranger1

Wireless adapters for digital cameras can be very pricey accessories, especially when you’re dealing with high-end DSLRs. Manufacturers can squeeze more money out of those who pay thousands for a camera by charging hundreds for an adapter, even though a cheaper one could work just fine. What’s more, the adapters are often designed specifically for certain cameras, making them useless if you change models or makes.

CamRanger is a new device that’s designed to solve all those inconveniences. It’s a standalone wireless adapter that connects to Canon and Nikon DSLRs using an ordinary USB cable.
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Olympus Apparently Working on a FT-to-MFT Adapter with Built-In AF and IS

Olympus currently offers a $144 adapter called the MMF-2 for photographers who want to use an existing collection of Four Thirds-mount lenses on a Micro Four Thirds camera. The accessory makes the lenses mountable and acts as a middleman between the lenses and the cameras, but its features pretty much end there. It appears that Olympus is working on a much fancier adapter: one that actually contains lens elements and contains focusing/stabilization features as well.
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Nikon Announces a 1 Series Digiscoping Adapter for Using Telescopes as Lenses

Digiscoping is when a photographer attaches an optical telescope to a digital camera and uses it as a super-telephoto lens. Although the image quality isn’t as good as an actual camera lens with the same focal length, it’s a much cheaper option for people who already own high-powered telescopes — bird photographers, for example. Nikon is no stranger to the digiscoping game, having released adapters for its DSLRs and compact cameras, but today it announced new accessories that bring digiscoping to the 1 Series mirrorless lineup.
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Want Cheap Glass? Buy a Vintage Lens and an Adapter

If you want a 50mm f/1.4 lens for your DSLR, you’ll need to shell out at least a couple hundred bucks, even if you buy one made by a third-party manufacturer. For those of you who don’t mind losing autofocus, you can get the same focal lengths and apertures for much cheaper by buying some old glass and an adapter. By much cheaper, we mean as low as $10-$20! India-based photographer Brock Whittaker recently did this after seeing an auction on eBay for an old Mamiya camera kit.
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Fujifilm M-Mount Adapter Gives Leica Shooters a Cheaper Option for Digital

There are already options available for those people who want to use Leica lenses with their Fujifilm X-Pro1, but for those of you who prefer to use only equipment from your camera manufacturer themselves, you now have that option as well. The new M-Mount adapter from Fujifilm, priced at $199, will be available sometime in June and brings with it compatibility with Leica’s wide range of high-end M Lenses. Fuji will also be releasing a firmware update alongside the M-Mount adapter in order to maximize compatibility with Leica lenses. The adapter and the lenses it “adapts” for don’t come cheap (then again neither does the X-Pro1), but if you’ve been wanting to shoot digital images with Leica lenses without a pricey Leica digital rangefinder, this option is certainly attractive.

(via Fujifilm)

Create Your Own DIY Tilt-Shift Adapter Using a 3D Printer

We really enjoy DIY projects for photographers, and as such we’ve featured everything from the ultra simple to complex light-painting robots. But what excites us about Instructables‘ DIY tilt-shift adapter isn’t just the durable plunger adapter you end up with, but rather the idea that one could manufacture their own camera accessories with a little bit of design skill and a 3D printer (check out Shapeways if you don’t have one sitting around).

For this particular project you’ll need a camera, an extra lens, some digital calipers, 3D design software like 123D, and access to a 3D printer or 3D printing service. After that just follow the steps in this video and you can wind up with results like the ones you see below. Read more…

Nikon WU-1a Wireless Adapter Demo with a D3200 and Android Phone

Here’s a brief glimpse showing Nikon’s new $59 WU-1a wireless adapter in action, being used to control a D3200 DSLR (the only camera supported at the moment) using an Android (the only mobile OS supported) smartphone. The video is in Chinese since it was created by Taiwanese website Mobile01, but it clearly shows the two main features of the adapter: transferring photos from cameras to phones and shooting remotely using the phone as a live view.

(via Nikon Rumors)

Make a DIY Grid Spot Using a Gutter Adapter and Drinking Straws

Photography enthusiast Jeff Vier made himself a cheap DIY grid spot using a $5 gutter downspout adapter he purchased from Home Depot and a $0.50 bag of drinking straws. Simply cut all the straws to the same length (the longer the straws, the more focused the light), carefully arrange them inside the adapter, and then use super glue to fix them into place. Vier found that his makeshift adapter fit perfectly over his Speedlight 580 EX II without any adjustments.


Image credit: DIY Grid Spot by boingr

Make a DIY Tripod Mount for Your Phone Using Binder Clips

Want to attach your smartphone to your tripod without buying a special mount? Two large binder clips can do the trick. Simply attach the clips to your tripod and then use the handles to cradle your phone. playstationfive has uploaded a step-by-step tutorial over on Imgur.

iPhone Tripod Mount using Binder Clips (via Lifehacker via Make)

Tip: Bring Your Own Power Strip When Traveling Abroad

Here’s a simple tip by photographer Benjamin Von Wong for traveling abroad: you can make recharging your devices overseas a breeze by building a charging station using a single power adapter and your own power strip.

(via DYIP)