Posts Tagged ‘accessory’

Flower: A Concept Lens Cap that Blooms into a Lens Hood

We’ve shared a lens cap and hood hybrid here before, but this one is much nicer. “Flower”, dreamt up by designers Rhie Hyi Joong and Lee Sang Hwa, is a concept lens cap that blooms into a hood by simply turning a ring.
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Leica Lens Holder Lets You Use Your Backup Lens for Stabilization

Leica offers a funky $200 lens holder accessory for its M system film rangefinders that screws into the tripod mount and lets you store an extra lens on the bottom of the camera. Here’s the description found on the site:

[...] the second lens also serves as a handle when it’s inserted into its bayonet mount, helping to provide additional stability when shooting handheld at long exposure times. The setup could even be used as a miniature tripod.

Makes sense. As we all know, the first thing a Leica shooter thinks when they drop big bucks on a new lens is, “Hmm. I’ll bet this lens would also work well as a mini-tripod!”.

Leica Lens Holder M (via Gizmodo)

Pose: A Camera Case that Doubles as a Simple Stand

Pose is a camera case that doubles as a simple stand. Designed to replace the little bean bags or mini-tripods that many people carry around separately, Pose has an attachment mount built in, and can either be propped up by itself on flat surfaces or wrapped around poles and curved surfaces. The $24 accessory is available for pre-order over at quirky, and will be manufactured if at least 1,000 people join in.

LockCircle: A Professional Body Cap for Hardcore Canon Shooters

If you’re a professional photographer taking your camera into extreme environments, the cheap plastic body cap that comes with your DSLR might not cut it. That’s where LockCircle comes in — it’s a solid billett aluminum body cap designed to seal your camera from the elements while providing a special grip for removal even if you’re wearing thick gloves. They’re available for Canon EF mount cameras in silver, titanium, and black, and will soon be available for Nikon’s F mount as well.

You’ll need a thick wallet in addition to your thick gloves though: unlike the plastic caps, which sell for a couple bucks on eBay, LockCircle caps will cost you $99 each.

LockCircle (via planet5D)

iPhone SLR Mount Lets You Attach Your Fancy Canon and Nikon Lenses

If for some reason you’ve always wanted pair up your SLR lenses with the tiny sensor found on the iPhone 4, Photojojo has a new mount that can make your dream come true. The package includes a special aluminum case for your phone, a UV filter attachment, and the lens adapter, and almost guarantees that you’ll be the strangest looking iPhone shooter on your street.
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Camera Wallet Boasts Five Card Slots

While real cameras generally max out at two card slots, this camera wallet packs five. It also “snaps” closed to keep your cash and cards safe. Pick one up over at fredflare for $34.

Camera Snap Card Case [fredflare]

Triggertrap Lets You Trigger Your Camera with Anything You Can Think Of

We have a bit of a scoop for you today: there’s going to be a new Kickstarter-funded gadget announced on Thursday called the Triggertrap. It’s a pretty nifty universal camera trigger that can trigger your camera’s shutter with anything you can think of using a built-in intervalometer, a laser trigger, a sound sensor, and an Aux input that you can connect custom triggers to:

Think about it: You press your car horn, it takes a photo. Your phone rings, it takes a photo. The sun rises, it takes a photo. Anything is possible – and that’s why this camera trigger is so eminently hackable and exciting to experimental photographers all over the world!

There’s also a private sneak-peek of the Kickstarter video over on Vimeo. The password is TriggerTrap123.
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Neat Retractable Lens Cap for Beefing Up Protection

Check out this wacky-looking custom lens cap designed by Japanese corp UN for the Olympus XZ-1. Many compact cameras don’t offer too much protection for the lens glass when the camera is off and the lens retracted (usually it’s a small plastic cover/curtain), so there are quite a few camera users that might benefit from a cap like this one. It’s secured to the front of the XZ-1 using an Allen key, and is pushed open when the lens extends from the body. When the camera is turned off, the cap automatically folds back into place to protect the glass. It’s supposedly available for about $90 if you email the company directly.

Lens Cap for Olympus XZ-1 (via OhGizmo!)

Capture Camera Clip Attaches DSLRs to Belts, Backpacks, Bikes, and Cars

Engineer Peter Dering wanted a better solution for carrying his DSLR around so, after tinkering around with ideas and prototypes for a couple years, he quit his job and designed the Capture Camera Clip System, a small device that lets you securely attach your DSLR to belts and backpack straps. There’s also plans for an attachment that will allow you to attach cameras to the frame of your bike or the roof of your car. The camera attachment uses the standard tripod mount, and the base piece has a quick release system that provides easy access whenever the camera is needed. It’ll cost around $70 when it begins shipping in July, but you can support the project and pre-order a unit for $50 through its Kickstarter campaign.
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Homemade “Fiberstrobe” Uses Fiber Optics to Split Light

If Doctor Octopus were to design a DIY flash accessory, it might look a little something like this. German microbiologist Marcell Nikolausz has been experimenting with using fiber optics to split a single flash unit’s light into multiple light sources. Optical fibers are threaded through Gorillapod-style Loc-Line channels, allowing flexible and stable positioning of the light sources. Each individual light source can be controlled using various modifiers (e.g. diffusers, gels, etc..), changing their quality and intensity.

For some sample photographs taken with this contraption, check out this set of photos. You can also learn more about Nikolausz’s experimentation on his blog.

(via Strobist)


Image credits: Photographs by Marcell Nikolausz and used with permission