Posts Tagged ‘accessory’

MoneyMaker Strap Lets You Carry Three Cameras Like an Old-School Detective

MoneyMaker is a suspenders-style camera strap by HoldFast that lets you shoot with three cameras at the same time while looking like a cop from old movies.

This harness derives its style from that indelibly cool detective in our collective memories with that boss leather shoulder harness holding his peacemaker. HoldFast modified the “bossness” to hold the modern shooters tools. Drawing from those classic themes, HoldFast designed a highly fashionable, highly durable, as well as highly comfortable harness for two or three cameras. […] The design of this harness keeps the cameras from hanging too low making them easily manageable, keeping them close to the body thus more comfortable. This setup truly shines on long shoots such as weddings.

Made out of top grain leather with anchored D-rings, this is the only multi-camera harness that actually gets better with age. The brown is oil tanned, making it very soft and malleable. The natural actually darkens with use and exposure to the sun.

The MoneyMaker is available in two colors (natural and brown) and two sizes (regular and large), and costs a cool $175 from the HoldFast website.
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An Always-On Case That Becomes One With Your Compact Camera

The Always-On Wrap-Up is a nifty camera case that attaches to your camera via the tripod mount. The case never gets separated from your camera, and all you need to do is unwrap it to take a picture. It costs $6 over on Amazon, and there’s also a version with a built-in tripod that costs $9.

Always-On Wrap-Up [Amazon]

Canon 500D DSLR Promotional Handbag

Singapore-based design agency One Paradox came up with this nifty idea for a promotional handbag for the Canon 500D DSLR. The camera strap handles make it the perfect bag for any photographers’ trip to the grocery store.

(via Behance via Wanken via Photojojo)

Luma Loop Camera Strap Killed Off After Patent Awarded to Black Rapid

It’s not just big tech companies engaged in patent wars: Luma Labs has discontinued their Luma Loop and Luma LoopIt camera straps after Black Rapid was awarded a patent for camera slings with sliding connections on November 1st. In an open letter to customers, the company writes,

We did our research, consulted our lawyers, and found more than enough prior art related to this concept.

[…] the idea of a sliding camera sling isn’t an amazing new invention. It’s just a really good idea that’s been around for a while and which has been iteratively developed. Neither we nor our lawyers believed that the USPTO would grant a patent for the claims related to this concept. It was a surprise, then, when our competitor was granted a patent covering the concept on November 1st, 2011. To say that we’re disappointed that the USPTO couldn’t find the prior art around the idea is an understatement.

Not wanting to engage in a costly legal battle, Luma Labs has decided to killed off their main products. Despite this setback, the company is planning on sticking around: it’s working on a new strap concept that will be released in December.

An open letter to our customers, past and future [Luma Labs]


Thanks for the tip, Kim!

Polaroid “Dua” Flashes: Designed for Both Photo and Video

At the Photo Plus Expo happening in NYC right now, Polaroid is showing off its new Dua Flash, a flash unit that also packs a strong LED light source for video recording. They’re already available for both Canon and Nikon DSLRs on Amazon, and cost between $160 and $200.

(via Steve’s Digicams)

Lens Band: A Gel Bracelet for Your Lens to Prevent Zoom Creep

Zoom creep is what happens when gravity causes your lens to zoom in or out due to it being pointed up or down. While it’s not really an issue when you’re shooting hand-held, it can cause problems if you’re trying to keep the zoom fixed while the camera’s on a tripod. A trick to combat this is to use rubber bands to keep the zoom ring still, but now there’s a fancier solution to this problem: the Lens Band. It’s a gel bracelet-style band that’s wrapped around the zoom ring when not needed. When you want to freeze the zoom, simply slide half of the band over the lens body.

They’re available in a variety of colors and sizes to fit most lenses, and cost $5 each from the Lens Band website.

Lens Band (via Pixiq)

RoundFlash: A Collapsible Ring Flash Adapter That Sets Up Like a Tent

The RoundFlash is a new ring flash adapter that’s lightweight and collapsible. Setting it up from its collapsed state is similar to setting up a tent: simply take the rods and stick them into the holes to expand the adapter.
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Nikon Lens Scope Converter Turns Lenses into Telescopes

The Nikon Lens Scope Converter is a rare accessory that attaches to the back of Nikon lenses, turning them into telescopes. You can sometimes find them listed on eBay for around $230. They’re designed for AF D-era lenses that have mechanical aperture rings, but you can “hack” your G lenses to be compatible by using a piece of plastic to keep the aperture blades in the open position.

Furthermore, you can mount the convert onto a Micro lens to make a microscope. Use it on a 105mm Micro lens, and you’ll have yourself a handheld 25x microscope!

How to convert your Nikon lens into a telescope or a microscope [Nikon Rumors]


Image credit: Photograph by Fabrizio Belardetti and used with permission

The M-Plate: One Camera Tripod Plate to Rule Them All

There are a number of products out there that connect your strap to your DSLR via the tripod mount, allowing it to swivel, but taking up the mount is an inconvenience for photographers who actually use it regularly with their tripod. San Francisco-based Custom SLR (makers of the C-Loop) has come up with a solution that offers the best of both worlds: the M-Plate.
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Joby GorillaPod Micro Tripod Designed to Become Part of Your Camera

There’s plenty of mini-tripods out on the market, but Joby’s new GorillaPod Micro tripods are special in that they’re designed to stay attached to your camera at all times. The legs fold up neatly when not in use, allowing you to stick your camera into your pocket or a case without having to remove the tripod. It features zinc alloy legs, rubber feet, and a head that offers 36-degrees of tilt-motion.

The tripod comes in two models: the $20 Micro 250 supports 250g and is meant for compact cameras, while the $30 Micro 800 supports 800g (~1.8lb) and can be used with larger mirrorless cameras.


Thanks for the tip, Bryn!