Posts Tagged ‘35mm’

Repurpose Empty Film Roll Canisters as Invitation Holders

If you’ve got spent, empty film cassettes lying around collecting dust, Photojojo has a crafty idea for the mindful re-user: make them into rolled invitation or stationery holders.

It’s quite simple: cut and decorate 1.375″ x 11″ strip of paper, pop the top off the film cassette (you can use a bottle opener) and tape the inside end of the strip to the film spool. Wind the paper into the cassette and leave a tab for the recipient to unfurl the message.
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Single Lens Reflex Wall Mounted Lamp

Italian designer Tommaso Guerra is known for transforming various objects into household design items. The wall-mounted swiveling lamp above was created using a 35mm camera, with a lamp shade as the lens shade. More photos here.


Image credit: Photograph by Tommaso Guerra

Collapsible Hanging Bookshelf Made with Reused 35mm Film Strips

VU35 is a new brand by Lucas Desimone and Matias Resich that offers products created from wood and reused 35mm film — a plastic material that’s difficult to dispose of. Their first product is a minimalistic collapsible bookshelf called Filmantes, which uses strips of film to connect three wooden shelves.
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Make Personalized Bookmarks Using 35mm Film Strips

If you have some unwanted 35mm negatives lying around and need a simple gift idea, you can try your hand at turning them into one-of-a-kind bookmarks. Simply cut out the actual frames from the film strip and replace them with actual photographs to create film strips that you don’t need to hold up to the light to enjoy.

Create a Stylish Bookmark with 35mm Film [Lomography]

LomoKino: The First Hand-Cranked Movie Camera that Uses Ordinary 35mm Film

Lomography has launched the LomoKino, the world’s first consumer 35mm movie camera. It’s an old-school hand-cranked camera that uses standard rolls of 35mm film (yeah, the kind you use in film cameras). The camera captures 144 individual frames onto each roll of film, producing a video that lasts 50-60 seconds. Once you have your film developed, you can watch it using a separate LomoKinoScope: a hand-cranked movie viewer!
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35mm Altoids Mint Tin Pinhole Camera

Photographer Chris Keeny came up with a nifty design for a pinhole camera made using an Altoids mint tin. It’s pretty fancy too, utilizing a re-loadable film take-up spool that uses a metallic turn key to advance the film.
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Make Stickers Out of 35mm Slide Film

Our camera stickers are fun, but for something more personal you can make your own 35mm film stickers. All you need is a sticker making machine that usually costs between $10-$20 online or in your local craft store. You can use any film you’d like, though slide film is recommended because it’ll give you positive image stickers. With film manufacturers struggling, any reason to buy more film is a good reason!

DIY: Make Easy & Fun 35mm Film Stickers! [Photojojo]

Unique Earrings Crafted From 35mm Film

Brussels-based jewelry designer Clement Marquaire creates one-of-a-kind earrings using old 35mm film. A pair will cost you $15 over in Marquaire’s Esty store.

Happy Factory Etsy Store (via Photojojo)

Working Leica M3 Paper Pinhole Camera

Photographer Matthew Nicholson created this paper Leica M3 that’s a working pinhole camera. It’s loaded with 35mm film, and even the strap is realistic and made with paper!
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How to Make Your Own Redscale Film

Redscale is a technique where film is exposed on the wrong side — rather than having the light hit the emulsion directly, you expose the film through the non-sensitive side.

The name “redscale” comes because there is a strong color shift to red due to the red-sensitive layer of the film being exposed first, rather than last (the red layer is normally the bottom layer in C-41 (color print) film). All layers are sensitive to blue light, so normally the blue layer is on top, followed by a filter. In this technique, blue light exposes the layers containing red and green dyes, but the layer containing blue dye is left unexposed due to the filter. [#]

The two main ways for doing this are loading the film upside down (if your camera allows it), or by purchasing film that has been “converted” already. A third way is to make DIY redscale film by going into a darkroom, pulling out the film, cutting it, flipping it, taping it back together, and then winding it back into the canister. Messy, but it works!
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