Posts Tagged ‘1900s’

Beauty Retouching from the Early 1900s: A Portrait of Actress Joan Crawford That’s ‘Photoshopped’

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Want to see an early example of beauty retouching in photography? Here’s one. The side-by-side images above from the early 1930s show what a glamour portrait looked like before and after manual ‘Photoshopping.’
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The Captive Airship: George Lawrence’s Panoramic Kite Photography Rig

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George Lawrence was a commercial photographer with a knack for engineering and business. Born in Illinois in February of 1868, his career reached its zenith in the early 1900s when he took to the skies, creating incredible aerial panoramas using an invention of his called the ‘Captive Airship.’ Read more…

Library of Congress Digitizes Archive of Early 20th Century Panoramic Postcards

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Last month, the Library of Congress finally finished a project they started all the way back in 2008: they finished digitizing an archive of 467 panoramic postcards from the early 1900’s. All of these postcards are now available online for interested folks to peruse through, learn from and enjoy. Read more…

Silly Photographs of Dressed-Up Bulldogs from 1905

When you think about photographs from the early 1900s, you probably think about boring monochrome photos of locations or portraits of people with humorless expressions and rigid poses. Photographs costed more in terms of time, effort, and money back then, so photographers didn’t waste them on silly photos, right? Wrong.

This series of photographs was created around 1905 by an unknown artist. Titled Bulldogs in Fancy Dress, it’s being preserved for eternal chuckles in the Library of Congress’ photo archives.
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Albert Kahn’s Documentation of Humanity Through Early Color Photography

Albert Kahn was a wealthy French banker who launched a project in the early 1909 that aimed to create a photographic record of the world. The first commercially successful color photography process, Autochrome Lumière, had just arrived two years earlier, and Kahn decided to use the medium to both document human life and to promote peace. He sent out an army of photographers to 50 different countries, amassing 72,000 photos and 100 hours (183,000 meters) of film that became one of the most important collections of images in human history.
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