PetaPixel

Annie Leibovitz Compiles Her Life’s Work into a 476-Page, Limited Edition, $2,500 Book

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When you’ve captured as many photographs as renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz has, it’s not exactly a simple task to pick and choose your best work. Shooting for over four decades for the likes of Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair, her collection of work is as vast as it is rich.

And so, when it came time to create her latest book, rather than selecting just a few dozen of her photographs, she decided to step it up… a lot. Her latest book is a $2,500, 476-page visual journey through every single step of Leibovitz career.

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Covering everything from politics to fashion, this behemoth of a book will feature her most iconic images, as well as some of her more rare photographs. It’s set to come in two variations, a $2,500 Collector’s Edition and the $5,000 Art Edition.

If the Collector’s Edition is the one piquing your interest, it’s limited to 10,000 signed and numbered copies. In addition, the Collector’s Edition will allow you to choose a dust-jacket for your new coffee table book, with the following images being your choices — Whoopi Goldberg (Berkeley, California, 1984), Keith Haring (New York City, 1986), David Byrne (Los Angeles, 1986), and Patti Smith (New Orleans, 1978).

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If the Art Edition (which is yet to be released) seems more up your alley, you’ll receive the entire collection of dust-jackets, as well as a signed archival print of Leibovitz’s photograph of Keith Haring. This one is limited to 1,000 copies.

Regardless of what edition you choose, you’ll receive a handy little tripod, designed by Marc Newson, that will cleverly hold your book. Rather appropriate considering this baby costs as much as a pro-level DSLR.

If you’re wallet is feeling heavy, you can head on over to the Taschen site and secure yourself a copy. And while the Art Edition is yet to be released, you can still pre-order it to ensure you aren’t left out of the 1,000-copy run.

(via JustLuxe)