PetaPixel

We Animals: Powerful Photos Highlight the Plight of Animals in Captivity

Polar Bear at the Zoo - Canada - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Polar Bear at the Zoo – Canada – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

It took photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur 13 years to compile the photography found in her book We Animals, but it will take only moments for your emotions to run the gamut between deeply moved and sickened while scrolling through her work.

National Geographic photographer Steve Winter has said that it’s the heartbreaking photos, not the beautiful ones, that truly inspire change — and McArthur’s photography is all about inspiring change.

But while the tagline for this particular series/book might be covering “the plight of animals in captivity,” We Animals goes beyond that. It’s an emotional roller coaster that doesn’t just cover the horrifying things McArthur has seen, but the inspirational and heartwarming bits as well.

We Animals cover_web resolution

She’s seen “intelligent, complex orcas on display in tiny tanks at marine parks” and “caged minks, destined for fur coats, crazed with fear and boredom.” But she’s also seen “the excitement of a beagle used for veterinary school surgery lessons take her first car ride as a free dog,” and “the quiet dignity of a chimpanzee released from an animal testing laboratory as he lived the last few years of his life at a peaceful animal sanctuary.”

All of these things are covered in the book, and just like the example images below, harrowing, dark and heart-wrenching images are followed by a conclusion that gives hope. There is mercy and joy to be found on the outside… it’s just that so few of these animals will ever experience it:

Fox Fur Farm - Europe - Credit: The Ghosts in Our Machine/We Animals

Fox Fur Farm – Europe – Credit: The Ghosts in Our Machine/We Animals

Woman With Deer Head - USA - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Woman With Deer Head – USA – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

A terrified macaque at a monkey breeding farm in Laos attempts to hide behind a small metal rod inside his cage. Macaque breeding farm in Laos - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

A terrified macaque at a monkey breeding farm in Laos attempts to hide behind a small metal rod inside his cage. Macaque breeding farm in Laos – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

A shirt-like restraint, used for primates and dogs. Things left behind at the biomedical research facility - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

A shirt-like restraint, used for primates and dogs. Things left behind at the biomedical research facility – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Spectators at a bull fight in San Sebastian de los Reyes, Spain - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Spectators at a bull fight in San Sebastian de los Reyes, Spain – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Animal Liberation Victoria- Australia - Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Animal Liberation Victoria- Australia – Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Chatuchak Market - Thailand - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Chatuchak Market – Thailand – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

A veal crate is readied for a newborn calf. Within a half hour of birth, calves are removed from their mothers so that the mother's milk can be used for human consumption. Calves are kept in veal crates, to be raised and eaten as veal, or to be put back into the milking system at the farm. - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

A veal crate is readied for a newborn calf. Within a half hour of birth, calves are removed from their mothers so that the mother’s milk can be used for human consumption. Calves are kept in veal crates, to be raised and eaten as veal, or to be put back into the milking system at the farm. – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Pig Going to Slaughter - Canada - Credit: The Ghosts in Our Machine/We Animals

Pig Going to Slaughter – Canada – Credit: The Ghosts in Our Machine/We Animals

Next for Slaughter - Spain - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Next for Slaughter – Spain – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Rabbit Slaughterhouse - Europe - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Rabbit Slaughterhouse – Europe – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Vivisection Activist Helen Nelson - UK - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Vivisection Activist Helen Nelson – UK – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Rescued From the Bush Meat Trade - Cameroon - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Rescued From the Bush Meat Trade – Cameroon – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Ron, surrounded by one of his famous nests. Save the Chimps. - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Ron, surrounded by one of his famous nests. Save the Chimps. – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Susie with Lucille, a rescued chicken.  Susie Coston is Farm Sanctuary's National Shelter Director.  In an interview w/ Jo-Anne McArthur, she reflects on 10 years at  this animal shelter, which she calls home.  Farm Sanctuary's mandate is to rescue, educate and advocate for animals used in the food industry.  The Sanctuary is located near Watkin's Glen, NY. - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Susie with Lucille, a rescued chicken. Susie Coston is Farm Sanctuary’s National Shelter Director. In an interview w/ Jo-Anne McArthur, she reflects on 10 years at this animal shelter, which she calls home. Farm Sanctuary’s mandate is to rescue, educate and advocate for animals used in the food industry. The Sanctuary is located near Watkin’s Glen, NY. – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Chimpanzee Sanctuary - Uganda - Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Chimpanzee Sanctuary – Uganda – Credit: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Jo-Anne McArthur & Orlando - Credit: Nick Ugliuzza

Jo-Anne McArthur & Orlando – Credit: Nick Ugliuzza

The book’s press release describes McArthur as “a ‘war photographer’ in an unseen and often intentionally ignored war on animals we eat, wear, experiment on, and use for our entertainment.” And although the comparison to a conflict photographer might be controversial she, like many of them, has spent over a decade photographing things other people would rather ignore.

The photos above are just the start. The real treasure is to be found in the full book (purchase here), which has been praised by the likes of Jane Goodall and Joaquin Phoenix. It’s packed full of over 100 photographs, notes from the field, captions that describe what it is you’re looking at and stories that, like the photos, are “sometimes beautiful, sometimes funny, and sometimes sad.”

We’ll leave you with some words from the photographer herself: “What you see may surprise or disturb you. My aim is not to turn you away but to draw you in, bring you closer, make you a participant. I want my photographs to be beautiful and evocative as well as truthful and compelling.”


Image credits: All photographs credited individually and used with permission


 
  • http://www.christiandebaun.com Christian DeBaun

    Some tremendous images in this series. Thank you Jo-Anne

  • OtterMatt

    I agree, her images are of stellar quality, and do a good job of showing what she wants to show, on both sides. I’m not the kind of person who thinks it’s okay to equate humans and animals, but I’m all about making our food sustainable and less cruel. It’s the photos of the animals who aren’t even destined or raised for food that really hurt.

  • Eli Burakian

    A really diverse set of images that are truly powerful. Clearly there is no easy distinction between wrong and right, but Jo-Anne’s photographs force use to think about aspects of our world with animals, and how we interact with them, in a deep and resonant way. Thank you.

  • Lee Ed

    I do equate animals and humans. What right do we have to kill any living creature, so we can eat? Laziness, stupidity and greed are the reasons we kill animals. Humans are a plague.

  • James

    The first one of the rabbits pink eye, locked locked right at you. I can’t lie, these things usually don’t phase me, but that one got me.

  • Really?

    See, this is why your movement never gets anywhere. Take a deep breath, and stop telling people they’re a plague. Who knows maybe showing some of that compassion you have for animals to those of us of the bipedal persuasion might actually get people to listen to you.

  • GSWSyndicate

    For many years I did not equate animals with humans. That has changed now that science has caught up (and way surpassed farming). Even lobsters and crabs can feel, analyze, make decisions, raise families etc); pigs are smarter than our smartest (dogs or cats), of course we know that most dolphins have a higher IQ than human 4 year olds, and all of them feel. Most wild animals (as well as domestic/farming are extremely strong in their family bonding. My grandfather was an animal farmer. I forgive him and everyone of his generation as science had not caught up. We didn’t even know at the time that wild animals could think much less feel or make decisions. It is important for most of them to run from 15-30 miles per day. Cages are not conducive to house animals. Birds “remember” humans after 1-2 times of “seeing” us in the forest (or in your yard). And yes, I’m a vegan now (for 2.5 years) and no, there’s no, I own not one leather possession. I live on the edge of a National Park and I see “my neighbors” living their life in freedom. My health has improved 10 fold since not eating meat, chicken, dairy etc. (Had 2 major heart attacks during my carnivorous life). I now climb mountains and hike miles daily. This same benefit happened to my wife (now a vegan). Let’s let animals live free. Zoos and other captivity environments are archaic and cruel. They were created so “we could study and know about animals”. Now we have the technology to do so without touching them in their own habitat; which means Seaworld, zoos, etc are not here anymore for education, but to make money off the slavery of living beings. Thank you for letting me share.