PetaPixel

First Look: Fuji 10-24mm f/4 Sample Photos and First Impressions by David Hobby

strobistfuji1

While in Dubai for GPP 2014, David Hobby (aka. Strobist) got a chance to play around with the yet-unreleased Fuji 10-24mm f/4 lens. He was kind enough to send us a link to his final images along with permission to share them, but we’ll warn you: if you’re a Fuji lover who isn’t looking to spend money, you’ll want to look away… she’s a beauty.

There are five sample shots in all, each of which are accompanied by descriptions that we’ve included in the captions. Of course, if you want the full effect, you’re going to want to head over to Hobby’s Flickr set and check these out in high-res.

At the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, I worked the entire trip with the Fuji 10-24mm, which was made for that place. Even at 10mm, you can't hold it all as a straight vertical. So I keystoned it (pointing the camera up and getting converging lines) and brought the verticals back in Photoshop. There were a lot of people in the same spot shooting at this gorgeous mix hour. Many were in front of me. But with the X-T1's articulating finder I held the camera up high over my head to avoid them. With the OIS, this unwieldy grip did not matter. Everything was tack.

At the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, I worked the entire trip with the Fuji 10-24mm, which was made for that place.

Even at 10mm, you can’t hold it all as a straight vertical. So I keystoned it (pointing the camera up and getting converging lines) and brought the verticals back in Photoshop.

There were a lot of people in the same spot shooting at this gorgeous mix hour. Many were in front of me. But with the X-T1′s articulating finder I held the camera up high over my head to avoid them. With the OIS, this unwieldy grip did not matter. Everything was tack.

This is a good example of the Fuji 10-24mm f/4's rectilinear look, even all the way zoomed out to 10mm. This lens if going to make a lot of architectural and real estate shooters very happy.

This is a good example of the Fuji 10-24mm f/4′s rectiliniear look, even all the way zoomed out to 10mm. This lens if going to make a lot of architectural and real estate shooters very happy.

The 15mm (FF) equivalent of the Fuji 10-24mm zoom makes views possible that are not doable with less wide lenses. Even here, I was at 10mm, and pushing it to get everything within the arch. But what I love is how straight the lens is -- superwide zooms just aren't supposed to be this straight. They generally go from barrel to pincushion, with a straight-line moment happening about halfway through the zoom. This thing is remarkably straight through the range.

The 15mm (FF) equivalent of the Fuji 10-24mm zoom makes views possible that are not doable with less wide lenses. Even here, I was at 10mm, and pushing it to get everything within the arch.

But what I love is how straight the lens is — superwide zooms just aren’t supposed to be this straight. They generally go from barrel to pincushion, with a straight-line moment happening about halfway through the zoom. This thing is remarkably straight through the range.

The optical image stabilization on the Fuji 10-22mm f/4 zoom is *ridiculous*. I have been making sharp, hand-held images at 2 seconds+. This one is at a ½ second. Combo of short focal length and great OIS is insane.

The optical image stabilization on the Fuji 10-22mm f/4 zoom is *ridiculous*. I have been making sharp, hand-held images at 2 seconds+. This one is at a ½ second. Combo of short focal length and great OIS is insane.

We won’t deign to draw any conclusions just from having looked at a few samples, but Hobby had this to say after trying out the new glass:

This thing is the real deal: Tack sharp wide open, surprisingly rectilinear and with RIDICULOUS optical image stabilization.

Don’t know about you, but we’re salivating. Check out the captions above for more detailed impressions, and then be sure to head over to the full Flickr set to check out the high-res files yourself. Oh, and if you’re ready to give in to temptation, you can pre-order the lens (which is supposed to ship by the end of the month) at this link.


 
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  • Jeromy Tan

    Fuji is blaring the big guns. Who needs FF anyway ;)

  • Graf Almassy

    “Who needs FF anyway”

    +1

  • Gok Han

    distorted as hell. if you have a small sensor and you try so hard to fit content in the frame, you force yourself to use lenses with apparently unrealistic projections. like this one. bigger sensors exist for a reason. architecture pictures look funny with 10mm.

  • http://www.bobcooleyphoto.com/ bob cooley

    I have several Fujis, and I love them (the company and cameras are changing the industry) – but there are many of us who shoot professionally who need complete control over depth of field, and many of the other advantages of Full Frame sensors.

    Full Frame is also a definite advantage in large prints where the larger photosites make a huge difference in quality both in low light capture and detail, again more important for those of us who make large prints, or are creating images for high quality offset or publishing.

    Give me a Fuji Full Frame – and I’m going to be a happy shooter :)

  • Alan Paone

    Are you saying a 15mm lens on FF would look any different? hint: no it wouldn’t.

  • Sterling

    Educate yourself.

  • waterworn

    Interesting that the photo of the engaged couple could have landed the couple and photographers in trouble with the police. Public displays of affection are frowned upon and often regarded as illegal…

  • DomDdom

    I shoot architecture with a 14mm on full frame and it does handle the distortion, or at least the distortion correction better, yes.

    This lens looks great, and I’m sure will be for certain applications, but the distortion here is crazy (which does look like it has been introduced after a run through a key stoning correction software in this lead image).

  • Cynical Bloke

    Erm I do

  • Gok Han

    help me. what would happen if you had FF? You could take picture of the same content with 15mm = less distortion. Am I on the right track?

  • Gok Han

    help me. if you crop 10mm, can you get the exact 15mm look? you can get 50mm field of view by just cropping it, then. But is it going to be look like an image taken with a 50mm on a larger sensor camera. If it doesn’t matter, Companies just produce a super high resolution sensor and we can use a 10mm all the time. What you are losing while trying to project a 3d world on a 2d plane is not a linear function of the focal length. 10mm and 15mm squeeze things differently.

  • TSY87

    Fuji definitely makes the best case for not needing FF, but I still prefer the look. If fuji makes a FF camera my a7r will be for sale!

  • Gok Han

    it will. How does proportions change when you move out from the center? Is the change linear? Is the ratio of the changes on a 10mm and changes on a 15mm stays constant? hint: no.

    Why not we have a 0mm and and infinitely small sensor and crop as hell?

  • Ken Elliott

    I do. My D800′s are much lighter than my Sinar 4×5, yet perform well on large prints. For large format shooters, our digital options are limited, forcing us to medium format, or a D800.

  • bdale

    I took a beautiful picture that I was so happy with and showed it to a friend and my friend said, “Good try but I can see the sensor you took this with was too small. It would be so much more beautiful with a bigger sensor.”

    I wish I would have taken the picture with a medium format or large format sensor so I could have gotten a beautiful picture.

  • reservoirdan

    Somehow you don’t seem to be taking into account that a 10mm on a crop sensor is identical to a 15mm FF. Same FOV. You aren’t seeing 10mm for architecture here. You are seeing the equivalent of 15mn. So your 14mm FF is pretty much the same thing.

  • Sean Walsh

    I’m a long time Nikon user, and if Fuji came along with a full frame camera and some lenses that can go toe-to-toe with Nikkor, then I’d very seriously consider selling most of my gear.

  • Gok Han

    yeah. you chose to buy an expensive small sensor camera. you have every right to expect capturing good pictures. This setup costs around $2300. Nice pictures man. super nice. happy?

  • Gok Han

    For this kind of shots, If you can fit the content in the frame: 14mm is better than 10mm. 20mm is better than 14mm. 24mm is better than 20mm…
    Of course, you can desire to see and experiment distorted lines. But, I stated that I don’t enjoy distortion.
    If you don’t change where you stand, with a 14mm on a FF, you get less distorted proportions than a 10mm on a crop sensor.
    You are projecting a sphere on a plane. If the sensor distance is the same, 10mm is compressing more towards the edges than a 14mm. Although, you crop it at the center, the compression is not linear and will be different and more unrealistic when compared with a 14mm.
    Yeah, you’re getting the same FOV , but did you measure and compare all the proportions in the images?
    A 10mm projects different even in the crop region.

  • Alan Paone

    By that logic the 10-30mm kit lens on nikon 1 cameras would be a horrible distorted mess. It’s not. You’re projecting a plane onto a plane.

  • Alan Paone

    It’s really obviously just hastily done software correction for the keystoning, rather than inherent in the lens, and it’s hard to blame David for that, look where he is!

  • Gok Han

    if you change the lens-to-sensor distance everything changes. How are you projecting a plane onto a plane and still getting out-of-focus lights in your projection? It’s a 3D to 2D projection.

  • Graf Almassy

    You’re right, but many travel and street photographer use big and heavy full frame DSLRs. I have a 5DmkIII and Fujifilm X-E2 and most cases I prefer the last one. :)

    I think most of the Full Frame DSLR users doesn’t really need the FF format.

  • Ondrej

    You’re talking rubbish. 10mm on APS-C sensor has EXACTLY THE SAME perspective distortion as 15mm on FF sensor. By exactly I mean exactly. If we won’t consider optical flaws specific to every lens and differences among sensors, we can overlay the APS-C shot over the FF shot with the same resolution and switch between these two layers, and see no difference. Literally every pixel will be at the same position. That’s optics, that’s how it works. Try it.

    So please do your own research before telling others they’re not right. Many of these false ideas are widespread among photographers… Similar situation was when Nikon salesman on photo fair was telling customers that the new small Nikon1 cameras achieve the same shallow DOF at the same FOV and aperture as their APS-C cameras… it took me like one minute and the two cameras with their kit lenses to demonstrate everyone in the room that it’s nonsense.