PetaPixel

5D Mark III vs 6D: Which is Better For You?

If you’re in the market to purchase a new full-frame camera from Canon, but aren’t sure whether to go with the 6D or 5DMIII, the folks over at DSLR Video Shooter have created the above video to help you compare and contrast the two offerings from Canon and decide if the 5D is going to be worth the extra dinero for you.

On the lower end of the price and features spectrum there’s the 6D, coming in at around $1900, but at the cost of fewer features. On the higher end of the spectrum there’s the 5DMIII, retailing for around $3,400 (although we’ve seen some pretty great deals lately) and packing all of the features you could want in a full-frame camera.

Both cameras are great options when it comes to both still and video, but it ultimately comes down to what’s more important to you: be it the better (though, perhaps, unnecessary for you) features of the 5DMIII, or the financial savings from going with the 6D.

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The video comparison comes in at just over nine minutes, but it’s filled with some great insight if you’re on the fence. Caleb Pike himself (the guy in the video) actually went with a 6D, because even though there are a few pitfalls, he found they weren’t an issue for him specifically. We definitely suggest you give it a watch if you’re in the process of making this decision.

And for those of you who have faced this ultimatum before and made a decision, which camera did you go with? And for what reasons? Let us and your fellow photographers know the what and why of your decision in the comments down below.

(via SLRLounge)


 
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  • Stephen

    That is one way to look at it, 100% versus 97%. The reverse way of looking at the difference is that the 6D gives you a 3% buffer, or safety zone, or margin of error around your frame.

    I respect anybody who tries to shoot without cropping. That’s tough. But I think most of us do crop. For one thing, the camera’s native aspect ratio isn’t always what we want for the final image. If you’re cropping even a little, that 3% quickly becomes almost meaningless. So I think for most shooters it’s not going to be a major advantage for the 5D.

  • http://dslrvideoshooter.com calebpike

    No, I bought the 6D after both cameras had been out. Had a loaner unit of each from B&H for a month to test. I was actually going to get the 5D3 but between the points mentioned in the video, and the killer deal I got, I opted for the 6D.

  • http://dslrvideoshooter.com calebpike

    Exactly. I rarely record audio straight to DSLRs on my gigs. Its fine for podcasts like this, but you shouldn’t be messing around with that on set. Dual audio and camera feed is best.

  • NancyP

    Landscape and nature photographer says: 6D. I don’t need a lot of bells and whistles. Price difference went into a used Zeiss 21mm f/2.8. Mmmm-good!

  • Anup

    The guy in the video said that he bought 6D for $1500 from B&H. When was that deal.? is the deal going on now?

  • http://dslrvideoshooter.com calebpike

    Hey, this is the guy in the video ;-) The deal was during black friday and is over. Keep your eyes open though, I wouldn’t be surprised if it drops again before too long.

  • Chris Pickrell

    Why would you track GPS? All you need is to pin the map. If you know it’s a hike it’s no big deal. But if it’s a drive, you can get their regardless. Tracking is unnecessary.

  • Zos Xavius

    those are all extra steps that wouldn’t be necessary if it recorded the information on its own. i didn’t say that i needed gps. i just said it was a nice feature to have.

  • BDWT

    It’s really amusing to see how many people comment on photo sites just to challenge bloggers and their opinions (or point out grammatical errors, haha) but it’s nice to see you posting here, getting involved and responding to people. Thanks for sharing your video with the community!

  • Zos Xavius

    That’s probably true. In that case it takes about two steps on my camera. Select manual WB -> take a picture. done.

  • Chris Pickrell

    So, again, how would you get it to your phone so you can get back to your location? Or do you LITERALLY just want to add the location of your photos to google?

    If that’s it, than you’re a gimmick fan. And that’s fine.

    But realistically, it serves no practical function.

  • Chris Pickrell

    The Rebel line typically has the WB on the 4 way I believe. Although it’s been a while since I had a Rebel.

  • Stephen

    You’re assuming the GPS information is viewed and will only be used as pure coordinates. But for most of us, “GPS data” means a pin on a map. We can read that without importing it into an iPhone for translation—which, by the way, assumes we want to return to the location, only one of a possible dozen reasons we might want the location recorded.

    If you want to keep your locations secret, so be it. Personally I think that’s roughly as silly as cooks having “secret recipes” and for all the same reasons, but hey, it’s prerogative and I’ve got no problem with it. C’est la vie. But in that case you can strip that info (GPS) out of digital files before sending them wherever you’re sending them. So it’s a little bizarre to argue that because a few photographers might want some of their locations kept secret some of the time, it is therefore “gimmicky” for the rest of us to want that info recorded as default.

  • Chris Pickrell

    Then explain why it isn’t gimmicky.

    Don’t tell me people want it. Tell me why it’s such a good feature to have.

    Don’t just say my argument is an assumption, and then tell me it’s wrong, without actually explaining why it’s better on your side of the argument. DOn’t call my opinion silly, and then offer no opinion of your own other than saying “It’s not a gimmick, we want it.”

    That’s silly.

  • RMcL

    I got my 6D’s for $1399 each – that was all the reason I needed to finally get a full frame body. 2 bodies, 6 additional batteries and genuine grips for the same cost as a single 5d3 body? No brainer for me.

  • http://www.zone-edit.com Blake Rudis

    I went with the 6D. I researched them both for months and it really came down to the features that the Mark 3 boasted were not really in line with my style of photography. I don’t need the speed or focus points as my subject matter is usually landscapes and food. The 6d was an amazing choice and I have zero regrets.

  • Osky Contreras Jaramillo

    What microphone did you use for record the video ?

  • photographer 1234567890

    Are you a troll? (Probably.) The XT-1 is an APSc sized sensor and Fuji has average video at best. The 6D and 5D Mark III are FULL FRAME cameras (2.25X larger sensor area vs APSc) and therefore are in a completely different class! Also Canon is a leader in video; much better than Fuji.

    Another thing to consider is lens availability. If you are only a stills photographer that is one thing, if you are also a videographer Canon has lots of stabilized lens, that Fuji does not.

    If you are not sure of the difference between categories of cameras educate yourself, instead of posting ridiculous comments!

    From the consumer point of view there are advantages to full frame, IF YOU NEED THEM. Find out what it is and then make an educated choice, instead of presenting your ignorance (lack of knowledge) publicly.

  • photographer 1234567890

    In response to Rudolfs Rancans:

    Are you a troll? (Probably.) The XT-1 is an APSc sized sensor and Fuji has average video at best. The 6D and 5D Mark III are FULL FRAME cameras (2.25X larger sensor area vs APSc) and therefore are in a completely different class! Also Canon is a leader in video; much better than Fuji.

    Another thing to consider is lens availability. If you are only a stills photographer that is one thing, if you are also a videographer Canon has lots of stabilized lens, that Fuji does not.

    If you are not sure of the difference between categories of cameras educate yourself, instead of posting ridiculous comments!

    From the consumer point of view there are advantages to full frame, IF YOU NEED THEM. Find out what it is and then make an educated choice, instead of presenting your ignorance (lack of knowledge) publicly.

  • photographer 1234567890

    The point here is about setting a CUSTOM white balance! Custom white balance tells your camera to read the light off of a pure white or 18% neutral grey card and then sets the white balance to neutral white. All recent cameras work well here; unless it is artificial light that cycles in its colour temperature (the white balance is constantly changing).

    White balance is the very easy to adjust in post, and one reason why it is better to photograph in RAW. For video or if you do not want to photograph in RAW, it is also very easy to either do a custom white balance (as explained above) or to go into the menu and give it a slight adjustment. Just remember to reset after you are in a different light source.

  • photographer 1234567890

    Did you know that on cameras with GPS you can turn it off? Personally I think GPS tagging is silly, but for travel photos it might be a nice feature; to find that perfect spot, or restaurant etc. again.

  • photographer 1234567890

    I agree that it is a gimmick, but the point is that you can always turn it off; so it is not a deterrent to have it. The WiFi is a usable feature for some. Built in on the 6D and so simple to use.

  • photographer 1234567890

    All you have to do is stop down the full frame 1 to 1&1/4 stops and then boost the ISO by the same. Then your depth of field will be the same as APSc (and the noise too as full frame is less noisy). With full frame you have the option to use it in lower light, and to have less depth of field when you want, and to also get more depth of field by stopping down when you want too!

  • BDWT

    Whether I’m working as a photographer or a cinematographer, one of my goals is to deliver the cleanest image possible to the editor/post-production team in case they want to do any post effects or heavy grading and while I understand what you’re trying to say, boosting your ISO should always be done as a LAST resort because even on full frame cameras, anything over 640 iso starts to show digital noise and I just won’t have it. The one and only proper way to close down for deeper focus would be to introduce more lighting to the scene, boosting your ISO is the lazy man’s solution.

    Thanks for your condescending remarks though, I’m sure many others will get a good laugh out of this exchange.

  • http://Taytus.com/ Roberto Inetti

    Thank you!