PetaPixel

Fuji Officially Debuts the Weather-Resistant X-T1, Boasts Fastest AutoFocus in Its Class

XT1_Front-Left_56mm_WhiteBK

It’s finally here! About one bazillion (official statistic) leaks and one teaser later, Fujifilm has finally announced the much-longed-for X-T1. With a weather-resistant body, a large and powerful OLED EVF and the fastest autofocus in its class, Fuji promises that this camera will make for a “truly remarkable photographic experience.”

Of course, that’s just press release lingo for, “it’s our camera and we’ll boast if we want to,” so let’s get down to the nitty gritty.

Inside the X-T1′s retrotastic body you’ll find the newest generation 16-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS II sensor, an EXR Processor II, built-in WiFi, a 1.04 million dot high-precision 3-inch tempered glass tilting LCD and a wide-angle 2.36M-dot OLED EVF with the world’s highest magnification for a digital camera (0.77x) and an insanely short lag-time of only 0.005 seconds.

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And quickness is the name of the X-T1 game. Other speedy features include 0.5 second start-up time, phase detection AF that delivers a response time of only 0.08 seconds, 0.05 second shutter lag and a 0.5 second shooting interval.

Finally, to top it all off, the X-T1 can shoot at 8 frames per second with tracking AF, and is compatible with SDXC UHS-II memory cards that boast write speeds that are about twice as fast as those of a standard SD card.

XT1_Top_18-55mm_WhiteBK

Coming in a close second in the order of importance behind speed for the X-T1 is weather sealing. It’s the first weather-resistant X-series camera, and Fuji was determined to do it right. With 75 points of weather-sealing, the X-T1 manages to be dust-resistant, water-resistant (we’ve seen that term can be pretty substantial in the past) and freezeproof to -14°F.

Other notable features include four different EVF display modes — Full (shooting info doesn’t obstruct the view), Dual (split-screen to help nail focus), Normal and Portrait (rotates shooting info when shooting vertically) — digital split image and focus peaking capabilities, ISO 100-25600, a built-in interval timer and in-camera RAW conversion.

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Of course, a weather-resistant camera needs weather resistant accessories, so alongside the camera, we’re getting a weather-resistant battery grip (the VG-XT1) and three new weather-resistant zoom lenses: the XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R OIS WR, the XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R OIS WR and the XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R OIS WR.

The X-T1 ships next month for $1,300 for the body only, and $1,700 for the camera and the XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens (pre-order by following those links). The weather-resistant lenses will arrive sometime this year, but no specific pricing and availability info has been released yet. Until they arrive, you can, of course, use the X-T1 with any of the current X-Series lenses (you just won’t be weather-resistant).

To learn more about the camera, head over to Fuji’s press room to read the release for yourself.


 
  • http://www.colinpeddle.com Colin Peddle

    To all the people telling the full frame proponents that “why should Fuji do a full frame, this sensor is great”… I ask you this…. Imagine… seriously… just think about it for a second: How absolutely amazing would a Fuji full frame sensor be in comparison to Canon’s or the Sony FF sensors found in the Nikon’s?

    Honestly… it could possibly be the BEST full frame sensor ever available on the market. Take that same X-Trans 16 megapixel tech and stretch it out over the 36×24 surface area and…. ***Drroooolllll***

    I don’t want a full frame sensor for the sake of a full frame sensor. I don’t want the same sensor as in my D4 jammed into my XPro2. I want FUJI’s full frame sensor.

    Given what they’ve done with the crop sensor — smaller surface area with 16mp jammed in there — a sensor that’s possibly quite a bit better than a traditional full frame is not out of the question should Fujifilm chose to make it.

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    In many situation and for many uses, I would agree. Where shallow DoF and low light performance doesn’t matter, then the FF vs APS-C debate is pointless. However, if you need to shoot in low-light situations and with plenty of bokeh (e.g. weddings), then a FF will better enable you to do that. There will never be a wedding photographer that chooses an APS-C body over a FF one. Even with equivalent F-stops and equivalent focal lengths (i.e. APS-C 56mm and FF 85mm), FF will ALWAYS have a shallower DoF and better low-light performance.

    And don’t mistake my comments for bashing on the X-T1. Its a great camera for people who are fine with APS-C. All I said was that I would pay double if they made this a FF camera. If Fuji would release a FF mirrorless X-T1 at $2600, I’d gladly pick that up over Sony’s RX-1 (noninterchangeable compact mirrorless FF).

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    I know how to make what I have work and have been developing my skills for a long time. The point is, I don’t need to “make what [I] have work.” I can pay for a more expensive body and more sharpness. I even said in my original post that I would pay double the price.

  • Rob S

    “In time people will look back on OVFs and chuckle at how primitive we were”

    Lets see….will the lag between reality and what you see in an EVF ever bee zero? No. It is a physical impossibility since the light must be received, processed, displayed, transmitted again, received and processed a second time. For those of us who shoot with one eye on the VF and one eye open, an EVF creates a constant cognitive dissonance where the brain expects two inputs on the identical time line but in fact receives them either in the present and in the past. The problem is your “capture” eye is in the past and you can’t capture an image that no longer exists.

    EVFs work for video because you roll constantly with lots of frames on either side of THAT image. But if you are shooting stills and you are better than spray and pray, that lag will cause you to miss shots. In fact, getting “the” shot will be more accident than plan.

    It will be a long long time before the optical qualities and processing power of the human eye and brain are called primitive.

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    Except for the fact that it was terrible FPS, no video, a non-articulating lcd, and terrible AF.

  • Vin Weathermon

    If I had a money tree, I’d buy one. I shot my wad on a 5dMKIII and ten years worth of lenses…too expensive to change.

  • sean lancaster

    I don’t shoot weddings, but my house has similar available light to what is found in many wedding scenarios. So I’ve gone FF over my NEX 5N. When I shoot street photography after the sun goes down, I find myself benefitting from the larger sensor as well. People are trying to make this issue far too black and white and it’s not.

  • Sky

    Yea, I thought the same initially – but novelty wears off. And when it comes to practical things – EVF offer very little advantage.

  • Sky

    Hardly a terrible one. And for that price – you get best sensor you can find on any camera and tons of manual controls. Oh – and a native support for lenses that are 50 years old or so – if you’re into these things.

  • Sky

    Sorry to burst your bubble, but X-trans sensors aren’t best even on an APS-C market (especially if you take into account ISO equivalents – which 99% of testers somehow miss, a basic school error).

  • Sky

    Well, 16MPx is pretty much optimum for APS-C – you don’t need high quality lenses to satisfy that number of megapixels, while at the same time it offers very detailed photographs. So no reason to complain :)

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    The sensor, Nikon lens mount, and manual controls are the things I like (save for the placement of some of the dials). Those are the good things it has going for it. My concern is with everything else if can’t do or does very poorly. Try shooting with it for day and you’ll understand.

  • Rob S

    So what it really comes down to is low light and bokeh because you can dispense with any arguments about lens prices when bokeh is that important. Lenses give you bokeh. And since bokeh is SOOOO important you are going to be shooting wide open or close to it meaning low light performance comes down to high ISO.

    Doing actual comparisons between sensors there is little if any difference in noise level between APS-C and FF between ISO 100 and ISO 6400. So now you are saying that for you it all comes down to being able to shoot f/1~3, 1/60th of a sec and ISO above 6400. Where are these weddings, caves?

    On the other hand as a Pentax shooter my K-5 is much smaller and lighter than your 5D and I can use small fast primes, aided by in body stabilization, that make it very easy for me to shoot in the 1/40s. And considering that the #1 job of a photographer at a wedding is being invisible you should be shooting 85-100mm. The “money” shots – tight framing of the bride and groom – would seem to be EASIER to get with an APS-C unless you want the entire wedding party looking at you instead of the bride.

    But hey, you have your needs. I wish my grandfather were still alive because then I can ask him how he ever managed to shoot a wedding with ISO 100 film let alone ISO 25. I think it was all a lie and wedding photographers had a secret deal where they and only then had access to ISO 12,800 film because duh! That is what you NEED for a wedding…….

  • Rob S

    Thousands of weddings were shot with APSC before FF existed. Thousands have been shot since. THousands more will be shot in the future.

  • ground

    So much of butthurt :(

  • ground

    Now i see… you are a nikon fanboy/ salesman right? the DF is one of the camera that received most bad feedbacks ever and you are here to bash fuji?

  • Genkakuzai

    Oh I agree completely, the same is true about full frame as well though. For the vast majority at least :) But people seem to always find a reason to complain.

  • sean lancaster

    When you claim the noise difference between APS-C and FF up to 6400 is “little” then I suspect you and I have a different definition of ‘little” because I can see significant differences when using the dpreview comparison tool for low light shooting. Certainly enough to not dismiss the differences as just a “little.”

  • Rob S

    Correct me if I am wrong – it appears that the speed and ISO are “hard” set by the top dials. Does this mean you can only shoot in shutter priority or Auto? I shoot aperature priority unless I am shooting sports or in extreme low light where I need to keep the shutter above blur level. Im not going to buy one but if I was looking for a camera being locked into shutter priority or Auto would be a deal breaker to me.

  • theart

    Your brain’s not as good as you think it is. The spread in average reaction times across the NHRA top ten (ie. ten guys with better reflexes than almost anyone making a living with a camera) is from something like 50ms to 100ms. The EVF lag on the XT1 is 5ms. The shot you get is always going to be later in time than what you thought you were getting. How much later it is because of the EVF is pretty much negligible.

  • Rob S

    Ill grant that at the pixel peeper level you can see the difference between SOME FF sensors and SOME APS-C sensors at ISO 6400. Now print an 9×12 and hold it at a normal viewing distance.

    I guess if your business model is shooting candle lit weddings in dark caves you need every drop of ISO you can get. I haven’t been to one of those. I have been to a ton of well lit indoor weddings and extremely well lit outdoor weddings. And millions, maybe billions of weddings were shot in the film days when 400 was FAST. I don’t think my grandfather ever used anything after than 100. Somehow he managed.

  • http://liminaleye.com/kxabout kodiak xyza

    I would say little as well: having the XPro1 and a 5Dmk2 and doing concert photography at low-light, in the conditions above (1/30th or less for shutter speed, and ISO 6400, and wide-open), then I find that the noise is close enough.

    that said, the sensibility to noise is different for the shots we take. if you want “all shadows bright”, then the “little” difference can be something to be bothered, and more so with Sony or other sensors. in general for APS-C, I don’t know… but my impression is that we are talking about the Fuji in APS-C, not all APS-C, and real-life results and image sizes/prints.

  • theart

    And millions were shot back when 400 speed film was “fast”.

  • http://liminaleye.com/kxabout kodiak xyza

    if like the XPro, and others, you can shoot as you wish.
    here, it is nice that they have an ISO dial.

  • bobjohnson

    On the Fuji XF system the lenses have aperture rings which you would use of Aperture Priority and set the shutter speed to A.

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    Go to DPReview and try the studio comparison tool and compare a 5D III to a 60D or 7D. There is a large difference in noise.

    And no, the weddings are not in caves but available light isn’t always as plentiful and you can’t rely on there being enough light so that you don’t need to go high iso or wide open.

    And who cares about a small and light camera at a wedding. If you’re letting weight choose your equipment at a wedding instead of body capability and image quality, I feel bad for your clients. Also, a heavier body+in-lens stabilization+high-iso+faster shutter speed beats out a light body+in camera stabilization+low shutter speed any day of the week.

    Lastly, FFs get everything in an APS-C image and more, so your framing issues are a simple crop away. And if your eyes can’t see well, then just liveview zoom.

    And you can shoot a wedding at ISO 100 just like you can enter a marathon without having trained. You’ll finish, just not as well as better trained athletes.

  • alealeale ale

    “Plenty of bokeh…” Noooooo! Stop. If you don’t know what you’re talking about shut up! Bokeh is used in photography as a term to describe the quality of the oof areas and the transition between the out and in focus areas. Not the quantity. You can have better bokeh on a pentax q at f8 than on a 5d at f1.2.

  • alealeale ale

    They’re better of with making better apsc sensors than making ff sensors just because some dumbass is judging them. We all know you’re here to troll because you’re an angry nikon fanboy that doesn’t understand why no one likes the df.

  • alealeale ale

    You’re stupid. It’s because the evf is enormous. Have you read the article or are you just here to troll?

  • alealeale ale

    Bloody nikon fanboy.

  • alealeale ale

    It’s because the evf is massive. And it’s way smaller than a dslr, it’s about the size of an xe2. It’s slimmer than a dslr coz it doesn’t have a mirror

  • alealeale ale

    Actually the xtrans cmos 2 is the best.

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    Yes, but just like with auto racing. There are different leagues. Just because there were thousands of street car races before and thousands more in the future doesn’t mean an F1 car isn’t better. Only F1 cars can compete with other F1 cars in F1 races.

  • GH0ST_SE7EN

    You’re absolutely right. I used it to refer to shallow DoF instead of quality.

  • Sky

    Nope, actually I’m a long-time Sony user that just happens to like this one particular camera (actually: it’s the only Nikon body I really like).

  • Sky

    lol. Fail.
    Way to go – insult people with a trolls and dumbass if you disagree with them.
    Oh, and BTW: I’m not Nikon fanboy, I don’t own any Nikon camera what so ever, not even compact.

  • Sky

    Somehow Sony managed to put really nice and large EVF in it’s NEX 7 without making it look like a half-assed SLR.

  • Sky

    Heck – even Fuji got it’s X-PRO 1 with really nice (size-wise) viewfinder in a rangefinder-style body. Where’s X-Pro 2 with a proper firmware and proper, modern EVF?

  • Sky

    Get over yourself.

  • Rob S

    First – I dont do weddings. I would rather do – and have done – conflict photography than deal with the stress of weddings. For being a wedding photographer I salute you.

    I personally use a K5 with a battery grip because I want the extra weight and the extra surface area to grip. But having used a friends canon also with a battery grip the thing is a monster. Add in the MUCH larger lenses and the thing weighed in at more than pound heavier than my kit. That adds up over the course of a day. There is a curve between weight equaling stability and weight that wears you out. I think Pentax gear is on the better side of that curve. And because my body/grip is almost always heavier than my lens the balance is favorable.

    The “In body vs in lens” debate will never be settled since both have advantages. But the biggest, and undisputed, advantage of in body is that it works with ALL lenses. Only recently has Canon had a fast, stabilized prime under 100mm. For what you spend on a stabilized 50mm I can get one of those sweet Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8…and it will be stabilized.

    Finally I agree with you on the 5D vs 60D/7D. But compare the 5D to the K5/D7100. For what ever reason Canon APS-C sensors are significantly worse than the Sony sensors used by Pentax and Nikon.

  • alealeale ale

    No problem. :)

  • Rob S

    The lens pictured does not seem to have an aperture ring. Does that mean you can only shoot shutter priority on some lenses?

  • alealeale ale

    Not as big nor as nice.

  • alealeale ale

    Just stop hating on fuji’s great and innovative products and technology. It isn’t that hard to appreciate things in life and not to be biased.

  • fera

    WOW so your clients are benn blind for so long time?

  • Rob S

    Sorry, apples and oranges. I have done a lot of work with simulations. TINY differences in inputs – visual, motion, sound – cause the brain huge problems. I have watched more guys puke because the sync between sound and visuals get off. Get visual and motion off….its messy.

    Your brain can detect those differences – even 5ms.

  • SEQLAR

    Now, drop the price of x100s to $1099 please!!!

  • theart

    Even a bad EVF doesn’t offset vision and motion as much as an IS lens, and people manage to use those all the time without puking. But my main point was about the idea of getting “THAT shot”. You’re not getting it now, and +/-5ms isn’t going to change that.

  • Carlos

    Nice gear. The only problem is its price… US$1700 with only 18-55 lens kit, more expensive than D7100 or 70D DSLRs. It’s make no sense.

  • Generalissimo Pantalones

    Fast autofocus is dandy. Shame it’s on something in the background.