PetaPixel

Photo Series Offers a Point Blank View of Different Guns

pointblack

Here’s a photo series whose subject we hope nobody ever runs across in real life. Called Point Blank, photographers Peter Andrew, Simon Duffy and Derek Blais have put together a set of photographs that give you a down-the-barrel view of several well-known guns.

It’s not exactly a happy set of photographs, the series is made up of extremely detailed large-scale ‘portraits’ of guns like the Glock and the Uzi as seen from the front. Speaking with Feature Shoot, Andrew explains that the point of the series was to take portraits of a powerful object in much the same way one would capture a powerful person:

Like powerful people, pistols have this ‘perfect’ quality that we wanted to explore. As we started shooting them, we could see flaws in their design. Metal burring around the barrels, scratches in the metal. This imperfection and detail were very interesting to us; connecting us back to these images as ‘portraits’.

These ‘portraits’ can then be examined in a way that this view would normally make impossible. “Typically, when you see a gun at this range and perspective it’s usually seconds before the pistol is fired.” Andrew, Duffy and Blais wanted to give viewers a chance to really look at and examine the guns from this view, in the same way one might look at and examine a face.

Here are the seven ‘portraits’ the trio has captured thus far:

Smith and Wesson .38 revolver

Smith and Wesson .38 Revolver

Desert Eagle

Desert Eagle

Uzi

Uzi

Glock

Glock

Smith and Wesson 9mm

Smith and Wesson 9mm

Rhino

Rhino

Beretta

Beretta

To follow along as they add more photos to the Point Blank project, or if you want to order prints, head over to the photo series’ website by clicking here. And if you’d like to see more of Andrew, Duffy or Blais‘ work, be sure to pay their websites a visit by clicking on the respective links.

(via Gizmodo)


Image credits: Photographs by Peter Andrew, Simon Duffy and Derek Blais and used with permission.


 
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  • Jake

    Beatles did it first.
    :P

  • Wilba

    [Pedantic Old Fart mode] The technical meaning of point-blank range is where the projectile rises through the line of sight, e.g. for a 22 rifle with a telescopic sight it’s about 25 yards. This is just another example of ignorant lazy usage degrading precise language (like using “massive” to mean huge, or “laptop” to mean notebook…).

    But hey, I enjoyed the photos. :-D

  • Blaster

    From Mat Soniak at Mental Floss

    “Point blank is the range at which a given weapon/ammunition combination can be fired at the center or vital area of a given target and hit it without the shooter having to adjust the elevation of the weapon to account for the effect of gravity on the projectile’s trajectory.

    As soon as a projectile weapon – whether a gun, bow and arrow or cannon – is fired, gravity causes the projectile (bullet, arrow, cannonball) to start dropping immediately. Within point blank range, this drop is insignificant and imperceptible. Any more distance between the shooter and the target, though, and the drop has to be adjusted for, usually by aiming above the target. Point blank range will differ depending on the weapon type, the ammunition being used and the target being shot.

    The origin of the phrase is a little murky. Two suggestions that consistently pop up: One is that it was coined in France during the Late Middle Ages and is derived from the verb point and blanc, the French word for “white,” and referred to the distance at which a French archer could point the arrow directly at the center of a practice target – which was usually white – and hit it without adjusting for the arrow’s drop. The other explanation is that it comes not from the era’s archers, but cannoneers, and refers to the position of the plumb-line on a gunner’s quadrant (an early aid in aiming) when a cannon was horizontal: the unmarked zero, or “point blank.”

  • BrokenHelix79

    I usually try to avoid getting sucked into conversations that don’t have anything to do with the subject of the article, but…

    According to three different dictionaries (yes, I looked), the word “massive” does indeed describe something “impressively large” and “large in scale, amount, or degree”. I would also argue that when a society as a whole adopts a word, it becomes as legitimate as any “proper” usage. Words do not just fall out of the sky as gifts from the heavens for us silly humans to use.

    But hey, I enjoyed the photos, too.

  • Victor

    Using the term “point blank” incorrectly is a pet peeve of mine but I’m pretty sure that battle is lost. It’s now a media cliche for any shot that’s made from “kinda” close range.

  • Bristol

    How is the usage of “point blank” incorrect here?

  • Wilba

    Whichever of the many definitions of point blank range you use, you can’t get “a down-the-barrel view” from that distance.