PetaPixel

Trippy Time-Lapse Complete With Giant Dinosaur and Mammoth Sculptures

We’ve seen some pretty cool and trippy time-lapses before (the few “lyric lapse” videos we’ve shared immediately come to mind) but the Borrego Stardance above takes the cake. Mixing massive metal sculptures of dinosaurs, insects, mammoths and more with beautiful star trails and the milky way, the folks at Sunchaser Pictures have created a time-lapse truly worthy of the designation “trippy.”

They chose to shoot the time-lapse in the desert town of Borrego Springs, California, which is incredibly well suited for photographing the night sky for one particular reason: It is one of only four communities in the world certified as a “Dark Sky Community.”

Amazing milky way passes over giant insect statues. Sculptures by Ricardo A Breceda. Photo by Gavin Heffernan.

Amazing milky way passes over giant insect statues. Sculptures by Ricardo A Breceda. Photo by Gavin Heffernan.

They received this designation by regulating outdoor lighting, allowing the star-filled night sky to shine in Borrego Springs without having to battle the “light pollution” common almost everywhere else. This allowed Sunchaser to shoot “definitely the best Milky Way shots we’ve ever captured.”

The dinosaurs are a different matter. Commissioned by philanthropist Dennis Avery and built by sculptor Ricardo A. Breceda, they are located in an area called Galleta Meadows, which Avery left open and free to the public when he passed away a year ago.

When you combine the spectacular night sky with scenes depicting massive insect battles and roaring dinosaurs, you get something pretty special.

Galactic star trails pass giant dragon statue. Sculptures by Ricardo A Breceda. Photo by Gavin Heffernan.

Galactic star trails pass giant dragon statue. Sculptures by Ricardo A Breceda. Photo by Gavin Heffernan.

On the technical side, the crew used a Canon 6D and a 5D Mark II paired with 24mm f/1.4 and 28mm f/1.8 lenses to get the shots. There were no special effects used at all. Star trails were captured with 25-second exposures, and all photography merging was done using StarStaX.

Here’s a quick behind the scenes video:

Check out the video at the top to see how this interesting mix of sculptures and stars turned out in the end. And if you like the final product, you can see more from Sunchaser Pictures by visiting their website.

Additionally, if you’re thinking of visiting this great location yourself, you can learn more about Galleta Meadows, the sculptures there, and the man who left them free for public enjoyment in keeping with his mantra “blessings are meant to be shared,” by clicking here.

(via Gizmodo)


 
 
  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    I enjoyed the trippy feel of the video, but I wasn’t a fan of the post-processing on the images (huge halos, funky colours, and out of focus shots).