PetaPixel

Interview with Jeff Lombardo, Ne-Yo’s Personal Photographer

Jeff Lombardo is the personal photographer and videographer for Ne-Yo. Visit his website here, his Facebook page here, and his Instagram account here.


jeff

PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Jeff Lombardo: For the past 16 years I’ve been working as an independent contractor in the entertainment industry as a digital artist. During those 16 years I’ve worked at many of the top ad agencies, motion picture studios and television studios in Hollywood such as, NBC, Universal Studios, MGM, FOX, Disney, and Warner Brothers.

My job titles varied from Graphic Designer, Production Artist, Web Designer, Web Producer and Art Director. I worked on The Dark Knight, Twilight, New Moon, WATCHMEN, SAW IV, X-MEN Wolverine, Yogi Bear 3D, Gangster Squad, and the Valkyrie campaigns, along with and many others.

Official Photoshop Master File for the Dark Knight

Official Photoshop Master File for the Dark Knight

My responsibilities consisted of creating key art, theatrical movie posters, outdoor ads, billboards, websites, home entertainment, DVD packaging and digital marketing campaign ad’s for media buys.

I also provided my creative services to the Video Game Industry (EA Games), Music Industry (Def Jam and Jive Records), Adult Industry (Hustler and Penthouse) and the Nightclub and Bar Industry. I recently picked up photography as my new medium and began to use digital photography in conjunction with my digital art background to create cinematic visuals.

Yogi Bear 3D in Progress

Yogi Bear 3D in Progress

PP: How did you first get into photography?

JL: After designing and working in the studios on and off for several years, I needed a change. When you work on movies or TV shows, your work becomes dated. Not in style, but in time.

You only appear as good as the last project you worked on. Having worked on The Dark Knight was great, until Dark Knight Rises came out. Having worked on Twilight and New Moon was great, until Eclipse came out.

I had this idea stuck in my head that I would always need to chase the next big project in order to stay relevant in my career. I knew going in that I had to give up my intellectual property rights – and I was ok with that (at the time). But when you start to see the movie(s) skyrocket at the box office and in popularity, you feel like the low man on the totem poll, left having to convince others that you are the one who created all the artwork and marketing materials.

It may seem far fetched to an outsider because they can’t wrap their head around it since they’ve never met or heard of anyone who does that kind of work. You never hear about them. Some of the best creatives in the world work inside agencies and studios and they just show up, do their work, take their lunch break, do more work, and go home. They go unnoticed.

After awhile I lost my passion for it. I decided to put everything I own in a storage unit in Los Angeles, put my top 3 clients on retainer and began traveling. I lived out of a suitcase for 2 1/2 years while freelancing from my laptop and traveling the world.

It may sound like I had it all figured out, but I didn’t. Not even close.

But I knew once you overthink a situation you tend to talk yourself out of it – so I didn’t think about it, I just did it. I knew it was what I wanted to do and I lived in that moment. You gotta have balls to do what you want in life. I vowed to figure it out as I went.

How can I plan something I never did before, anyway? It’s trial and error at that point. When you force yourself to figure it out, survival mode kicks in – and trust me, you figure it out. My wild idea turned into 62 flights in just 10 months. I did alright. It’s certainly not for everyone, if it were, more people would be doing it.

Lombardo's travel itinerary after 90 days

Lombardo’s travel itinerary after 90 days

Map of Lombardo's Foursquare Check-ins

Map of Lombardo’s Foursquare Check-ins

PP: How did you get your job as Ne-Yo’s personal photographer?

JL: In year 2 of my travels there was a new social media giant on the horizon called Instagram, and Instagram allowed me to take photos and share them instantly with the world. It wasn’t just Instagram that caught my attention as much as the photography apps that were being developed.

Now I had Photoshop (my bread and butter) in the palm of my hand. I could still have the element of ‘design’ while traveling, without having to be in front of my computer. It wasn’t just a picture from a camera phone anymore, now I was creating art. I discovered a new passion for taking pictures and combined it with my 16 year career that I could now hold in my hand.

During it’s early stages I followed a guy by the name of Lenny S. (aka @kodaklens on Instagram). The next morning I woke up and I saw he had liked a bunch of my photos and followed me. Little did I know he would become the backbone of my photography career.

I knew of Lenny through his work and through some mutual friends but had never actually met him or talked to him. Lenny S. is a music industry executive; Senior Vice President of A&R at Def Jam Records and recently made a transition over to RocNation. Lenny S. also happens to shoot for JAY-Z and Beyonce, personally.

After we connected on Instagram he invited me up to Def Jam for a meeting. We shared a mutual respect for one another’s work, accomplishments and history. I admired his legacy and his access and he admired my talent.

In short, the conversation went something like this:

Lenny: “Talk to me, how can we help each other? What’s goin on?”
Me: “Well you know my history with design and the internet but as of right now now I’m just following my passion of traveling and taking pictures.”
Lenny: “Internet…design…traveling…taking pictures. Ok, I have an idea. NE-YO was recently out in Dubai and a sheik sent over $250,000 worth of champagne and it was pouring out of the walls as Star Wars was playing…and no one is capturing that! Someone needs to capture that! Is that something you would want to do?

As he’s saying this, I’m sitting in his office looking around at the gold and platinum plaques decorating his walls from Biggie, JAY-Z, Kanye West, Diddy and others – thinking to myself…Really…who IS this guy???

Me: “Lenny…why wouldn’t I want to do that!?”
Lenny: “Haha. ok! DONE!”

Lenny S.’s Def Jam office

Lenny S.’s Def Jam office

3 weeks later I received a text.

Lenny: “Do you want to go to Haiti with NE-YO? I need to know in 5 minutes.”
Me: “Yea.”
Lenny: “I’ll have someone from the label contact you to arrange your travel.”

Funny part of the story is I didn’t have a passport yet. I received his text on Tuesday at 5PM and I had to leave on Thursday. I ended up rushing my passport and getting it the next day, 2 minutes before they closed at 5:00PM – exactly 11 hours before I had to leave to catch my flight.

Lenny arranged a driver to pick me up in Brooklyn and I met him at 5AM while on my way to the airport in Newark, NJ, where he handed me his Canon 5D Mark II, 2 lenses – no bag.

Up until this point I haven’t shot with anything other than an iPhone 4S or a point and shoot. What got me this far was passion, creativity, post-production skills, networking, mutual respect, and someone who believed in me and was willing to give me a chance.

I received a 5 minute crash course on how to use a 5D Mark II while standing in a parking lot in the middle of winter in New York – and off to Haiti I went.

I arrived at the airport and met with the crew and boarded my first International flight, ever! I had Lenny’s borrowed camera equipment to take care of, a 5D Mark II to figure out on the way, an A-list artist by the name of NE-YO to document, and a record label counting on me to capture great photos and video. Things went from 0-60, quickly. Nah…no pressure at all.

Lombardo, NE-YO and the President of Haiti, Michel Martelly, at the National Palace (Haiti’s White House)

Lombardo, NE-YO and the President of Haiti, Michel Martelly, at the National Palace (Haiti’s White House)

NE-YO signing his hat before exchanging hats with a child at an orphanage in Haiti

NE-YO signing his hat before exchanging hats with a child at an orphanage in Haiti

PP: What is it like to work as NE-YO’s personal photographer and travel from place to place?

JL: Speaking on my experiences to people who don’t know my personality or my history is tough because a lot of my experiences are unrelatable to everyday people and it can rub them the wrong way. I say that because I’m still an everyday person who happens to enjoy keeping one foot on both sides of the fence. I never want to forget where I came from, but I don’t necessarily want to stay there either.

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

In a literal sense, for those who get thrills from fancy things, yea, we’re walking through underground tunnels in airports, flying in private jets, riding in a fleet of Rolls Royce’s, meeting with Presidents and getting driven through third world countries in bullet proof unmarked police cars with sirens blaring at 2AM.

Other days we’re performing with other recording artists at concerts, doing LIVE radio interviews, performing at TV and award shows while having access to just about everything and traveling in double decker luxury tour buses equipped with the latest technology while on tour in the UK.

When we’re not sleeping on tour buses, we’re sleeping in 5-diamond hotels and eating at 5 star restaurants. There’s no shortage of luxury.

GoPro mounted to the Rolls Royce in London

GoPro mounted to the Rolls Royce in London

NE-YO and Tim McGraw at soundcheck in Nashville, TN

NE-YO and Tim McGraw at soundcheck in Nashville, TN

NE-YO and 50 Cent posing with CNN Heroes

NE-YO and 50 Cent posing with CNN Heroes

Again, that’s speaking in the literal sense. Perception is reality and my reality is humbled by it. I’m not only grateful for the opportunity and the chance to experience life in this way, but I’m also thankful for the people involved that have given me a chance to experience life in this way.

I understand and recognize it’s an honor and a privilege to be where I am. It’s not a job position you find online. NE-YO is a Multi-Grammy Award Winning Artist and Songwriter and is arguable one of the best songwriters of our generation who has worked with Beyonce, Rihanna and Michael Jackson just to name a few.

But it’s not all glitz and glam. That trip to Haiti for NE-YO’s Compound Foundation was a life changing moment for me. We met with children in orphanages after the earthquake and handed out toys for Christmas. I remember reading writings on the wall and being emotionally moved by all the messages to keep smiling and keep hope alive.

This was the first time I ever left the country and that was my experience. I was taken back by it all. I’m grateful that what I do entails documenting experiences because I’ll have these memories forever.

NE-YO in a writing session

NE-YO in a writing session

PP: What are your days like outside of photography?

JL: I don’t really have any days ‘outside’ of photography. I got into photography as a hobby and it turned it into a career. So even when I’m not ‘working’, I’m still enjoying photography as a hobby.

When we have off days on the road I’m still out shooting the city in my free time and soaking up as much as I can. NE-YO is one of the most humble and genuine people that I’ve ever met, and seeing him interact with fans around the world night in and night out, right in front of me, and to witness the amount of work he puts in is admirable.

If it’s not soundchecks, it’s dance rehearsals. If it’s not dance rehearsals, it’s appearances on radio, TV, or in a nightclub. If it’s not appearances, he’s in the studio. The energy, motivation and inspiration is contagious and it makes you want to become the best version of you possible, therefore I’m always working on something.

Dance rehearsal for The Voice

Dance rehearsal for The Voice

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

NE-YO in a Google Hangout before a concert in the UK

NE-YO in a Google Hangout before a concert in the UK

PP: What is a typical day like for you?

JL: Witnessing a concert come together is my favorite part of shooting a concert – aside from the energy and hysteria. If a show is at 7:30, we’ll usually arrive at 3 for soundcheck.

Walking around an empty arena or stadium out of state/country is very exciting. I often think about all of the history that happened before I was there. Some venue’s have an aura. All the photos of championships and memorable concerts backstage are awe-inspiring.

NE-YO on stage during soundcheck at Jingleball in Los Angeles

NE-YO on stage during soundcheck at Jingleball in Los Angeles

I usually walk around and try and grab photos and videos of just about everything, inside and outside. Most of the content will never be used, but it’s still great to look back on. I like to venture out before a show and get landscape and travel photos since that’s where I started.

I also get a kick out of watching a venue transform from completely empty to completely sold out. People with all different cultures, faces and styles fill the audience between countries and it’s hard not to grow as a person when you see that.

There’s a certain feeling you get when you are thousands of miles away from home, outside of your comfort zone, part of a team that consists of of dancers, a production crew, assistants and artists all working together to accomplish the same goal. It’s just you and a small team of people there to show up, show out, and tear the roof off the building – then move on to the next city (or party).

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

PP: What is shooting a concert like?

Shooting a concert is different than shooting a tour. As much as I love being a concert photographer, being a tour photographer has it’s advantages. When the same show is performed night in and night out, you’re able to grab shots you missed the previous nights, shoot from different angles with different lenses, shoot the crowd and also learn when and where certain pyro and lights are going off.

For the most part, I overshoot. I never aim to shoot tomorrow what I can shoot today because something may change. The only time I’ll plan to re-shoot something is if I feel I can make it better.

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

PP: What have you learned about photographing concerts so far that other photographers can learn/benefit from?

JL: The single most important thing that I’ve learned is – access is everything. I wish there was a short answer on how to get access but there isn’t, it’s more of an art form.

Knowing someone will open a door for you but your talent is what will close the door behind you. Everybody had something they need, and everybody has something they can offer. It all comes down to your ability to hustle and connect the people in your contact list.

On stage at Jingleball in Los Angeles

On stage at Jingleball in Los Angeles

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

Shot during the R.E.D. UK Tour

I can’t speak for everyone, I can only speak on what’s worked for me. Persistence and confidence are the two most important things I believe one should have in order to succeed. It all comes down to selling yourself. When you truly know what you can do, you’ll feel like people need you just as much as you need them.

Then it becomes a level playing field in your mind. When you speak with confidence you no longer have to focus on selling yourself because your confidence is what sells you. People will start to feel like they need you. And when you finally get to the point where you truly know the value of your work, let your work speak for itself and don’t interrupt. People will start searching for you instead of you having to search for them.

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard. The difference between who you are and what you want to be, lies in what you do.
(R.E.D. UK Tour finale in London’s O2 Arena)

R.E.D. UK Tour finale in London’s O2 Arena

R.E.D. UK Tour finale in London’s O2 Arena


 
  • Michael M

    I have never commented on this site before and I have been a long time visitor. I came here to say that admired Lombardo’s story and success, from the beginning to present!

  • dennispike

    Now you’re a professional photographer, here’s how a DSLR works. That rubbed me the wrong way

  • http://www.purseblog.com/ Vlad Dusil

    Congrats Jeff on your success – pretty nifty gig you got going!

    I found the last three paragraphs to be very inspiring and impactful for any inspiring pro photographer.

  • https://twitter.com/adamhowardcross Adam Cross

    always love the interviews. thanks, Michael

  • http://www.richardsnotes.org Richard

    This is a great piece. What a great evolution and an amazing use of social networking.

  • frank mckenna

    This guy is a phenomenal photographer. I love it and what a story…

  • Focus Dave

    He displayed skills in creative vision, networking, and post processing—sounds like a professional to me. The fact that he had never used a piece of equipment isn’t that big of a deal in my opinion. I’d rather have someone use Auto or Shutter Priority who knows what a good picture is rather than a tech savvy shooter who can’t frame a shot properly.

  • dennispike

    skills in creative vision, networking, and post processing do not a professional photographer make. and it’snot JUST a piece of equipment when it’s the foundation of your profession. I don’t care that is was a DSLR or canon or nikon. But that the extent of his photography experience was with a phone and and point and shoot. This story in my opinion is the equivalent of hitting the lottery. 99.99999% luck.

    What about the people who have literally dedicated their lives to the artistry and study of photography and will NEVER get a shot at anything close to that.

  • Martin

    I dont understand. So the guys has been travelling for 2 years and then he meets the guy of the record label. Now he has to rush to get a passport and boards his first international flight? something doesnt sound right…

  • Focus Dave

    They should get more Instagram followers, I guess. Sure, he’s lucky, but why use that to discredit him? There are also people who dedicate their lives to automotive tuning who never become race car drivers. Some folks spend their lives studying music and never get “the big break.” I’ve had home brewed beer that trumps most mass-produced stuff, but you’ll never see it on the shelf at BevMo.

    tl;dr Get over it.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/zackhuggins/ Zack

    Sure, a lot of his big break was luck and knowing the right people, but he did figure it out. Not everyone gets the chance to do things like this, and some that do can’t cut it once it comes. This guy had the right mix of being in the right place at the right time, knowing the right person, and then being able to run with it and make it work. I don’t think that discredits his talent, if anything it makes it more impressive that he was able to jump in the water and come up swimming, so to speak.

  • Mike

    Seriously great photography and talent. This stuff clicks.

  • Gman

    Agreed. Article is all backwards and as usual, not proof-read.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Martin, I apologize if I wasn’t clear enough in the interview. I was traveling domestically prior to having the opportunity to goto Haiti. Once I received my passport to goto Haiti, I began traveling Internationally after Haiti – in between the dates I was booked with NE-YO. If you look at my Foursquare map you can see my travel activity in the United States to reference my point. I hope that clears up any confusion. Thanks for reading!

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Gman, I hope the point I made above clears up any confusion for you as well. I appreciate your feedback.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Thank You, Michael. I’m happy I could add some value to your read. I appreciate your support and everyone who else who gave your comment a thumbs up. :)

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Mike, thank you. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Frank, thank you for the positive feedback. I appreciate you.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Richard, I’m glad you found value in my story. I wish you the best.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    I’m happy you’ve learned from my mistakes, Vlad. haha. They’ve make for great experiences.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Dennis, luck? What about dedication, persistence, 20 hour days, 16 years in the same field and networking in 14 counties, 47 states (5x), across 1,000,000 miles? Not to mention, Social Media? That’s luck to you? I consider it a reward for hard work.

    Your phone doesn’t just ring with opportunity on the other end out of the clear blue sky without putting work in, at least not in my world. However, my phone has rang out of the clear blue sky with opportunities many times because of the people I put myself in front, the hands I’ve shook and the people I’ve taken care of.

    My design background has been useful to many people who own businesses. Many of my friends and clients have needed logo’s, business cards, websites, marketing and promotion material, you name it. I’ve put work in on numerous levels, whether networking, doing favors, doing things off the strength of relationships or connecting people with my resources. No one has EVER handed me ANYTHING. Joe Blow could have met the same contacts I met, it doesn’t mean Joe Blow would have had the same outcome. Talent isn’t always what gets you through the door, Dennis. Most of the time it’s based on your likability. You would think after reading my interview saying how I was discovered on Social Media, you would have a better outlook on what you say and how you brand yourself on Social Media. Tonight could have been your night to get discovered, until someone saw your bitter comments filled with hate and decided they didn’t like your attitude. You never know who is watching.

    Someone handed me a camera and I ran with it in digital photography and found a good gig. So what? If someone handed me a hammer in construction and I ran with it and became a master contractor, would you still be bitter? Probably not. You’re bitter because we both use camera’s to make money and I caught my break and you or the people (you) know didn’t – since you mentioned people who have dedicated their lives to photography and haven’t shot anything close to that. Maybe it’s not your talent, maybe it’s your attitude that hasn’t gotten you your break yet.

    We we’re doing good on here. There’s so much positive feedback and people showing support. I knew someone was going to have something negative to say. It always happens. Welcome to the internet.

    You don’t know where I came from, what I’ve been through, my struggle, my journey or anything – you only know what you’ve read on PetaPixel.

    As one of my favorite quotes says – “Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those that are doing it.”

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Dave, I appreciate you speaking on my behalf. I’m glad you understand my journey. We are on the same page.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Zack, thank you for your support. I appreciate you taking the time out to share your point of view. You get it, and I respect that.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Adam, Michael is a good guy. Thank you for reading!

  • Neil Shearer Photography

    Never commented here before, but I love the concert shots! It’s not many people who get the opportunity to do what you do, and you’re killing it! Keep up the good work!

  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    Nice story :) It shows that there’s more to taking photos than knowing how to operate a camera!

    Also, that first black and white photo is unreal, awesome work!

  • hysyanz

    thats the same thing i was thinking. i was wondering how come no one caught that earlier. i guess that were to taken up in the sensationalism of the story and the flashing light that they just glazed over it.

  • Robby Cornish

    Great article. Love to read about “what it takes” to become a professional photographer and the journey in the process. What’s even more impressive is that the photographer being interview takes time to reply to comments on his article!

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Dennis, what about passion, dedication, persistence, 20 hour days, no sleep, 16 years in the same field, networking in 14 countries and 47 states across 1,000,000 miles? What about putting myself in front of the right people, shaking hands with right people, and sharing my resources at will? What about sacrificing time, money, friends and family to pursue my dreams? That doesn’t count? What about being smart enough to leverage my my design talent as an asset to build relationships and network with people in the industry and business owners who needs logo’s, business cards, a website, or promotion and marketing material so I can move up the success ladder? What about accomplishing everything I mentioned in the article and more – without a college degree? Was that luck too? Some people just make it happen, other’s make excuses. I don’t understand how you can hate on anyone who is self-made. You call it ‘luck’, I call it a reward for not only working hard, but smart. Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the people who are doing it. Hating isn’t a part of my brand. I wish you the best on your journey.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Thank you, Neil. I believe you have to seize the moment before it’s someone else’s moment.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Agour, thank you brother.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Of course, Robby. I read PetaPixel all the time. Why not engage with people who I’ve inspired or took the time out to say something positive. Relationships go a long way.

  • Focus Dave

    #pwned

  • ikea

    Excellent interview. I’m a graphic designer myself, so I can relate. To any naysayers out there, graphic design and photography are quite similar… beyond the similarities in software, they’re both all about composition, color, light, rhythm, etc. And let’s be honest, using a camera is not that hard compared to something like Photoshop. Someone who knows what they’re doing with Adobe programs should be able to figure out how a 5d mkii works in 5 minutes, no problem. Hell, we work with photos all day and half of them are shot on mkii’s… you can learn a lot just by looking at the exif data.

  • Justin Hopp

    Jeff, I find your work amazingly creative. I know from similar experiences that it isn’t easy to be thrown into situations, trying/figuring out new equipment and layer creativity with it all. What I like most about this whole article is the humility you have on your self and journey. Most people in your position don’t have that, let alone most people don’t. You take the time with each person that interacts with you in the most humble way. It’s nice to see, which is a great influence on people like me who are trying to create, because that’s what they’re born to do!

  • dennispike

    no hate in my heart, none whatsoever. I was not trying to be a jerk, or anything like that. I do understand that you have put in a lot of hard work, and certainly knew your craft of design very well.

    That being said, getting a job as a photographer for music star, from a contact made from Instagram, and mutual friends (or acquaintances, contacts, etc) without ANY professional photography experience, or experience with a DSLR IS indeed lucky. VERY lucky in my opinion. And it is just that, MY opinion.

    The other thing to keep in mind is that if you didn’t perform on that first gig and came back with crap, they would not have kept you on. You clearly did not. Your photos are very good, you would not have a job if they were not. Regardless of how you obtained said job.

    I was not trying to beat you down or take anything away from you. I was merely stating that luck had quite a bit to do with your current position, and I stand by that. I also stand by the fact that it rubs me the wrong way that a record exec would hire someone as a photographer with little to no photography experience.

    That has nothing to do with you. to not have taken that opportunity would have been insanity. I would have jumped on such an opportunity as well, and will in the future should I ever be given one like that. It ended up working out for you, and I am happy for you.

    I think my comments were misinterpreted as a critique against you. They were not meant to be that. I question the decision of the man that hired you. I would not have made such a decision, even though it ended up working out for all parties involved. That being said, I am not in any position to make such decisions.

    I harbor absolutely no ill will towards you, and I wish you the best, and continued success in your future.

    All the best,

    -D

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    This is exactly why he’s an executive and you’re not.

    “I question the decision of the man that hired you. I would not have made such a decision, even though it ended up working out for all parties involved.”

    I believe your concern isn’t really a concern after all because you said it yourself. “If you didn’t perform on that first gig and came back with crap, they would not have kept you on. You clearly did not.” You’re right.

    Some people have a knack for discovering talent and are paid to do so. He’s one of them. Executives make executive decisions. What’s left to talk about? We won. I came, I saw, I conquered.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Couldn’t have said it better myself, ikea.

  • http://JeffLombardo.com/ Jeff Lombardo

    Thanks, Justin. I believe staying grounded is an essential part of success.

  • dennispike

    “This is exactly why he’s an executive and you’re not.”

    very true, among a myriad of other reasons. And again, I apologize if my initial comments came off as malicious or as a personal attack against you.

    Again, all the best in your future endeavors.

  • Blake Bobit

    are you in the illuminati?