Posts Published in July 2012

The 7 Levels of Awareness in Becoming a Professional Photographer

I have been taking pictures for almost twenty years now and so much has changed over those years. Back in the beginning gas used to cost $1.00, Bill Clinton was president, and I was picking up a camera for the first time. I started out in high school playing with my father’s Nikon FM2 and taking pictures for the school newspaper. Today, I work with a medium format digital back shooting national ad campaigns, magazine articles, and catalogs. Some aspects of how I photograph have stayed unchanged, but a great deal has changed considerably.
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New EF Lens Adapters Offer Electronic Control on MFT and NEX Bodies

If you own a Micro Four Thirds or Sony NEX camera and you’ve been dying to use your Canon glass on it, thus far your only options have been sadly manual in nature. Because the adapters on the market today don’t make the electronic link between the camera and the lens, you’re left focusing and (if you can at all) adjusting the aperture by hand. Fortunately, lens adapter company Kipon has a couple of solutions around the corner that it has decided to tease us with. Read more…

Replacing Guns with DSLRs in this Epic WWII Video

Here’s a cool video from the mind of videographer Devin Graham where he takes the standard, dramatic WWII scene and replaces the guns with cameras. No worries, there are still plenty of explosions — in fact Camera Warfare is downright epic at times — but instead of SMGs and massive rockets you get SLRs and massive lenses.

And for the videographers out there who want to see how a project of this scale comes together, there’s a nifty behind the scenes video waiting for you on the other side of the break. Read more…

40 Years of Landsat: Time-Lapse Videos Show Changes to Earth’s Face

Yesterday marked the 40th anniversary of Landsat, the longest-running program focused on acquiring satellite photos of Earth. The Landsat satellite snaps one completely photo of the Earth’s surface every 16 days, and the petabytes of photos collected over the years have given scientists a view into how our planet’s surface has changed over time, whether by natural or human-caused means. Google is currently working to make the photos easily enjoyable by the general public by transforming them into time-lapse videos.
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Polaroid Brand Name Soon to Be Found on All Kinds of Random Gadgets

Polaroid the company was named after the inexpensive polarizing film developed by founder Edwin Land back in 1929. Over the years it became an iconic brand name associated with easy-to-use cameras and instant photos. After the company went bankrupt in the early 2000s, the brand name was sold off to a holdings company, which began licensing the name to third parties.

Up until now, the brand name has been used for mostly photography-related products, but that’s set to change: Polaroid has partnered with British retail chain Asda — owned by Wal-Mart — to branch into other electronics, including televisions and media players. The gadgets will hit store Asda shelves by the end of the month.

(via Pocket-lint)

Wedding Photographer Threatened with Ludicrous $300,000 Lawsuit

Photographer and entrepreneur Gary Fong was recently contacted by a wedding photographer who found himself in a pickle: after doing a “great job” (in Fong’s opinion) in shooting a wedding, he received a menacing letter from the couple threatening him with a $300,000 lawsuit. The video above shows Fong reading the letter — which sounds an awful lot like blackmail — and explaining some of the mistakes made by the photographer. The main takeaway: always sign a contract!

(via Gary Fong)

Jaw-Dropping Slow Motion Footage of Lightning Shot at 7,207 FPS

Photographer Tom Warner shot this slow motion incredible video of lightning at 7,207 frames per second. APOD writes,

The above lightning bolt starts with many simultaneously creating ionized channels branching out from an negatively charged pool of electrons and ions that has somehow been created by drafts and collisions in a rain cloud. About 0.015 seconds after appearing — which takes about 3 seconds in the above time-lapse video — one of the meandering charge leaders makes contact with a suddenly appearing positive spike moving up from the ground and an ionized channel of air is created that instantly acts like a wire. Immediately afterwards, this hot channel pulses with a tremendous amount of charges shooting back and forth between the cloud and the ground, creating a dangerous explosion that is later heard as thunder. Much remains unknown about lightning, however, including details of the mechanism that separates charges.

It’s amazing how much action goes on in just a blink of the eye.

Single Stroke CG in High Speed (via APOD)


Video credits: Footage by Tom A. Warner/ZTResearch/WeatherVideoHD.TV and used with permission

Lytro Rolls Out the Windows Version of Its Software

If you’re a Windows user that preordered a Lytro light field camera, here’s some terrific news: your expensive paperweight is now a camera. Lytro announced the Windows version of its desktop application today, more than half a year after the “shoot-now-focus-later” camera was first unveiled. To free your photos from their camera prison, you’ll need to be running Windows 7 with at least 2GB of ram.

(via Lytro Blog)


Image credit: Lytro 16GB & 8GB versions by laihiu

The Truth Behind Instagram Photos

The truth behind Instagram photos

Andy Pandy of Pandyland drew this humorous strip titled “Instasham” that shows what goes on behind Instagram photos — and online photo sharing in general, for that matter. Pardon the language.

Instasham by Pandyland (via Laughing Squid)

Behind the Scenes with Gravity-Defying Chinese Photographer Li Wei

Here’s a great behind-the-scenes video by The Creators Project featuring Li Wei, the Chinese photographer whose gravity-defying photographs have captured the world’s imagination. You can see some of his work in this interview we did with him back in 2010.

(via ISO 1200)