PetaPixel

Incredible Flowers Created with Splashes and High Speed Photography

Photographer Jack Long has an absolutely amazing series of photographs titled Vessels and Blooms that features liquid flowers captured by shooting high speed photographs of splashes. The images are not faked with Photoshop, but are instead single exposures that result from months of planning and testing.

You can find more of Long’s amazing work over on Flickr and 500px.

Vessels and Blooms by Jack Long (via Colossal)


Image credits: Photographs by Jack Long and used with permission


 
  • Suman0102

    THE F@#K! This is just way too amazing! 

  • Dave

    Hard to believe they are just one shot. Not saying I don’t believe it, just a stretch for me. How are the splashes emanating from what appears to be a sold table?

  • Robert dole

    Hey Dave, do you understand the concept of a splash?? It often occurs when liquid hits a SOLID surface (like say a table for example!). Instead of thinking about the liquid in the photos as ‘emanating’ from the table, you might think about it as being dropped on to the table and refracting into the air.

    Stay in school!

  • Ross

    Great photography. Great idea. Clearly not one shot so why advertise is as such. @robert why the attitude?

  • The Judge

    Relax…..
    Hmm…Maybe if I write in a way you would understand: RELAX!!!!

  • Dave

     You don’t need to be an idiot about it, or can’t you help it. I am wondering how you can achieve that effect without any tiny messy splashes getting all over the place. It’s amazing.

  • Suman0102

    now that i think about it, maybe its not really a table? I mean, it COULD be a flexible type of membrane with a speaker below it. I’ve done enough water drop shots in my life to know that its not typical to get a [single] shot like that from water bouncing up from a table after it has landed (in the traditional sense). any thoughts guys/gals?

  • The Judge

     Wild idea, but what if there is a hole in the table and the is liquid being pumped up from underneath with various hoses etc (ie: one source for each “flower” and a wide ring-like source for the “pot”? So as the liquid is shot out of the hole it creates a “stem” and as it hits its peak, gravity spreads it out like “leaves and petals”.

     The liquid is definitely not bounced, as liquids just don’t have that type of property…just an idea. Anyone else?

  • http://www.facebook.com/wouter.nieuwerth Wouter Nieuwerth

    All of the images have a similar round ‘base’, so I guess there is a hole in the table where the liquid is pumped through. Maybe it is combined with some sort of fan or multiple fans on the other side that cause the liquid to move in a certain direction.

    I think these shots are absolutely fascinating!

  • Suman0102

     that’s actually a pretty good assumption. i’m no physicist but that seems to me like it would be able to produce the types of shots seen here. +1 The Judge

  • Brett

     

    Think of it as two holes, one at
    the top (out of shot) and one at the bottom, jets of one color are squirted out
    the bottom and blobs of another color are dropped from the top, hence the
    impact like effect, just another idea!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1558692487 Jack Long

    Absolutely One Capture!! What would be my incentive to lie? Dave’s the smart one.

  • http://www.facebook.com/valeriej Valerie James

    I figured there was a hole in the table that the splashes were ‘bursting’ out of. But either way…hole or solid table…the splashes could be made. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1558692487 Jack Long

    So don’t call it “splash” technically. Splash is a general term adapted to cover a wide range of fluid based photography.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1558692487 Jack Long

    So don’t call it “splash” technically. Splash is a general term adapted to cover a wide range of fluid based photography.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1558692487 Jack Long

    So don’t call it “splash” technically. Splash is a general term adapted to cover a wide range of fluid based photography.