Posts Published in April 2012

Connecticut Bill Could Make Police Liable for Interfering with Photographers

In the past year — and especially with the growth of the “occupy” movement — police interfering with photographers or pedestrians trying to snap a photo of them has been in the news quite a lot. Just yesterday we reported on the Olympics’ security guards who landed in hot water after harassing photogs shooting from public land. In the past, this was no problem, as police officers had little to fear in way of personal liability when they interfered; however, a new Connecticut bill — the first of its kind — may soon change that.
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Rotobooth is a Photo Booth Powered by a Rotary Phone

Created by Chris Bell, Liangjie Xia, and Mike Kelberman, Rotobooth is a novel new photo booth with a twist — literally. It’s powered by a hacked rotary phone and shoots a photo after the user dials their cell phone number. The image is then automatically uploaded to Flickr and a link to the photo is sent as a text message to the phone number provided. Check out this interview with Kelberman to learn more about the project and this Flickr set to see some behind-the-scenes photos.

Rotobooth (via Make via Laughing Squid)


Image credit: Photograph by Mike Kelberman

Fujifilm to Increase Its Worldwide Film Prices Starting Next Month

Bad news if you’re a film shooter and Fujifilm is your brand of choice: the company has announced that it will be increasing the worldwide price of its entire line of photographic films starting in May 2012. In the announcement, the company blames demand and economics for the decision:

The demand for film products is continuously decreasing, yen’s appreciation and the cost of production, such as raw materials, oil and energy, continues to rise or stay at high level. Under such circumstances, despite our effort to maintain the production cost, Fujifilm is unable to absorb these costs during the production process and is forced to pass on price increases. To sustain its photo imaging business, Fujifilm has decided to increase the price of photographic films.

Fujifilm remains committed to photographic products and asserts that even with the new price. Its photographic products remain exceptionally good value compared with other system products.

While the announcement doesn’t mention how much prices will increase by — they state that it will vary depending on market — Fuji Rumors reports that it will be an increase of over 10%.

(via Fujifilm via Fuji Rumors via Mirrorless Rumors)


Image credit: Roll On by Looking Glass

Gear Doesn’t Matter — Except When It Does

If you follow any part of the photographic blogosphere, you’ve heard folks repeat this mantra over and over and over again: “Gear doesn’t matter.”

The basic premise of that dictum is as follows: making great pictures is about the photographer, not the camera or the lens or any other piece of gear. A good photographer can make a great image with a point-and-shoot that an amateur armed with a Nikon D4 and an 85mm f/1.4 lens can’t match.
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Engagement Photo Taken in the Middle of a Freeway

Photographer Cynthia Chung got engaged in October of last year and recently decided to try her hand at shooting her own engagement photographs. After traveling around with her fiancé to various places with her fiancé cameras, lenses, a tripod, and a remote, the couple spontaneously decided to try something slightly crazy:

[...] we headed back to queens to go to a local park instead to shoot a few more. On the way back, I said, “hey Jeddy… wouldn’t it be cool to shoot on the highway… all the moving cars…” Next thing we knew, we were risking our lives on the 678 trying to get a decent shot. All while cars were honking away at us. Life threatening, but a really awesome shot came from it! I definitely know I have a keeper — if he’s willing to brave standing in the middle of a highway with me just for a picture!

The sequence of shots captured were also turned into an animated GIF that shows the cars whizzing by. You can find the rest of the photos they made over on Chung’s blog.

(via Cynthia Chung via Doobybrain)


Update: As many readers have kindly pointed out, this is an incredibly risky (and illegal) stunt that you shouldn’t try to copy.


Image credit: Photograph by Cynthia Chung and used with permission

Nikon Recalls Some D7000/D800 Batteries Due to Overheating Issue

If you’re a Nikon D7000, D800, D800E, or V1 owner listen up, because Nikon has issued a voluntary recall on the rechargeable Li-ion EN-EL15 battery that’s used to power those cameras. Nikon discovered an overheating issue that can deform the outside casing of the cameras (at this point there have been only 7 confirmed cases worldwide) and is offering anybody with a battery whose 9th serial number digit is either “E” or “F” a free replacement. More details on both the problem and how to get your replacement can be found in Nikon’s service advisory.

EN-EL15 Rechargeable Li-ion Battery Service Advisory [Nikon]

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Neat Camera Trick Makes Falling Water Appear to Float Upwards

A couple weeks ago we shared an interesting video in which a speaker and Canon 5D Mark II’s frame rate were used to make water appear to be frozen in mid-air. This new video by YouTube user Brusspup takes the idea to the next level by making the water appear to travel upwards. He explains:

Fill a bucket full of water and place it about 5 feet off the ground. Place a subwoofer about 1 foot lower than the bucket. Run a plastic tube from the top bucket down in front of the subwoofer. Tape the tube to the front of the speaker. Then aim the end of the tube to an empty bucket on the floor. Get the water flowing from the top bucket. Now just generate a 24 hz sine wave and set your camera to 24 fps and watch the magic happen. Basically your cameras frame rate is synced up with the rate of the vibrations of the water so it appears to be frozen or still. Now if you play a 23 hz sine wave your frame rate will be off just a little compared to the sine wave causing the water to “move backward” or so as it appears. You can play a 25 hz sine wave and cause the water to move slowly forward.

This experiment has become quite a trend as of late — this particular video has been viewed over a million times in less than a week.

Stealthy Street Photography by the Czech Secret Police

In the 1970s and 80s the Czechoslovak secret police, among other things, were charged with surveying the population without their consent or, for that matter, knowledge. Taking pictures from under coats or inside suitcases, the secret police kept tabs on the goings on of the general public. And while the act itself is voyeuristic and creepy, the pictures turned out surprisingly well. Read more…

Cardboard Digital Camera by IKEA

Check out this strange looking digital camera made by IKEA out of cardboard. It was included as part of a press kit at an event in Europe recently, and apparently the “disposable” camera might go on sale sometime soon in IKEA stores. It uses two AA batteries and stores up to 40 photographs in the built-in memory. Images can be downloaded to your computer using the USB connection that swings out from one of the corners of the camera.

(via Fancy via Gizmodo.it)

Woman Aims to Meet and Photograph Her 626 Facebook Friends in Real Life

After amassing 626 friends on Facebook two years ago, Tanja Hollander began to wonder how many of them were actually friends in the conventional sense. She then set out to answer the question by meeting each one of them and photographing them in their homes. The portraits are published on a website set up for the project, titled The Facebook Portrait Project, and each photo includes some information about the subject and their relationship to Hollander.
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