PetaPixel

World Press Photo of the Year 2012

This powerful photograph by photographer Samuel Aranda was introduced today as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. The description reads,

A woman holds a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011.

The image was selected from 101,254 photos that were submitted to the World Press Photo 2012 competition by 5,247 photographers in 124 countries. You can check out all the other winners in the different categories on The Big Picture and over on the World Press Photo website.


 
 
  • Mantis

    When we Westerners see a woman dressed in burka or something similar, we often feel such a huge cultural rift between them that it can be dehumanizing. 

    We may sometimes forget that there’s an other human being under there, living their own life and having their own emotions.

    Wonderful image.

  • Qwerty

    *2011

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/throughpaintedeyes/ Through Painted Eyes

    I have a hard time believing this to be true. There are obviously cultural differences, but I would argue most are very conscious that there is a person under the veil. Maybe it’s a Canada vs US thing.

  • http://blog.volgyiattila.hu Attila Volgyi

    World Press Photo has the (IMHO strange) tradition to have in the name the year when the results are published and the exhibition started which one is the next year when all the photos were taken.
    So World Press Photo 2012 photo contest presents the photos from the year 2011. And strangely the best news photo of the year 2011 is named to be the World Press Photo of the Year 2012….strange enough but this is the official.

  • http://twitter.com/OfficialDan Dan Howard

    What I’m about to say might miss the point alittle, but It’s abit unfair that we “Normal” photographers don’t have crazy stuff like this happening in our western culture. We just get to photograph the occasional football riot.

    meh!

    *Moves to war torn country*

  • http://www.naturpixel.com/ Guillem Calatrava

    If you browse the web www.wordlpressphoto.org, first page, there is photo of Samuel Aranda with the title ”World Press Photo Of The Year 2011″ … (no 2012)

  • Wil Fry

    So no matter what happens in the rest of 2012, no photo will beat this one? Interesting.

    When I first saw this photo, I wasn’t moved at all. Why? Because it didn’t tell me anything. Without a caption, it’s almost meaningless — at least to me.

    I can’t tell whether the man is sick, or wounded, or dead… or just really tired. I can’t
    tell if the other person is showing compassion or about to do something
    horrible to the other person. For all I can tell from this image, it could be a firefighter suffering from heat exhaustion.

    An image is supposed to be better than words, be able to say something without words. When an image requires paragraphs of words to tell me why it’s emotional, then the image fails.

  • Tintwotin

    Watch the winners on Youtube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mY4ZVnmhMuc

  • mrbeard

    A great example of the rule of thirds, i’d guess its a crop from a bigger image

  • http://www.liquidinplastic.com/ Dan N.

    It is a very powerful image on many levels. The “repressed” female appears to be a strong platform in the interaction between the two. Her black attire, usually a symbol of piety and subservience, looks dominant, protective, nurturing and stable compared to the relatively frail looking injured man. We are also shown a usually private intimate moment between the two which demonstrates the universality of human affection.Great shot!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_REHYISKMGXURQ6NM63X4MJB4YY ROB

    this reminds me of the La Pieta by Michelangelo in the Vatican, http://gardenofpraise.com/art50.htm
    The  us vs. them thought is pitiful. we are always easy to judge people that are not like us here in the west and dismiss them as uncivilized, and inferior to our way of life.

  • 9inchnail

     Most photojournalist travel the world, they don’t photograph their backyard. Samuel Aranda is from Spain, not much happening there either. So get off your ass if you want to take photos like this.

  • Anne

    I don’t quite understand your comment.. are you saying ‘we westerners’ dehumanize foreign cultures because of their apparel? speak for yourself, I would say it has the opposite effect.

  • Guest

    boohoo people find this image more impressive than the tree in your backyard? you could always do what every single hipster “photographer” does and harass homeless people for some portraits.

    also, speak for yourself. there’s tons of crazy things happening in our “western” culture, plenty of events worth snapping–even locally, not just drunk football fans

  • William Howell

    What, is this supposed to be a simile of Mary and Jesus, muslim style. Great photo my a$$, this stirs nothing but contempt for that so called governing body world press photo. Or they could be calling attention to the fact that arab men have the reputation for retreating or giving up in battle, just sayin’.

  • Ashrafsaharudin

    Strange, why i didn’t see this photo during the World Press Photo 2011 exhibition in Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre last week? 

  • http://blog.volgyiattila.hu Attila Volgyi

    Because WPP 2011 is from the 2010 pictures and WPP 2012 is from 2011 images. So what you saw is the exhibition from last year’s contest – this year’s contest is not yet open and it probably will arrive to you next year about the same time during its world tour…

  • http://blog.volgyiattila.hu Attila Volgyi

    Seems logical to be so. But messy even then. So the best photo of the World Press Photo 2012 contest is called the World Press Photo Of The Year 2011. It’s still carzy I think.

    They should simply call the contest by the number of the year the photos are taken and keep it simple. But it will never change I suppose – so people and journalists too will loose the track at a point.

  • http://blog.volgyiattila.hu Attila Volgyi

    Seems logical to be so. But messy even then. So the best photo of the World Press Photo 2012 contest is called the World Press Photo Of The Year 2011. It’s still carzy I think.

    They should simply call the contest by the number of the year the photos are taken and keep it simple. But it will never change I suppose – so people and journalists too will loose the track at a point.

  • Subra Nity

    It looks artificial & a setup because a) background b) he doesn’t seem to be that badly wounded c) the pose looks cinematic d) why those white gloves? Is it common in Syria? I hope I’m wrong.

  • niccaa

    When images like this are “selected” it’s proof that humans are truly sick minded people who get off on other peoples suffering. Why not promote and select happy pictures that inspire people rather than focus on other peoples pains.

    Oh but pain is so emotional to look at that it makes a wonderful photo… Sure when the pain is yours!