Posts Published in January 2012

How to Manually Create an HDR Photo in Photoshop

Here’s a tutorial on how to do non-automated HDR for real estate photography using Photoshop CS5. The first thing you’ll need is a sturdy tripod with a level. The closer you are to a leveled image, the less correction you’ll have to do later.
Read more…

Sample Photos Show Fujifilm X-Pro1′s Crazy Quality at High ISOs

When Fujifilm said that the X-Pro1′s sensor “resolution and low noise will surpass rival 35mm full size sensor[s]“, they weren’t kidding. Photographers Christian Fletcher and Michael Coyne have both been testing out the camera, and have extremely positive things to say about it:

My initial feelings are that this camera is a worthy replacement for a bulky dslr system. If you have to travel light, this is the camera for you. Physically it is only marginally larger than the x100 so slinging it around your neck for a day is no problem. In fact I am wearing mine right now!, it is a fashion accessory!! Man bling! or Girl Bling too for that matter. [#]

Fletcher has published a number of untouched sample photos to his blog, including the ISO 6400 image above shot by Coyne. Click here to check out the full-res version (be prepared to pick your jaw up off the floor). Some more sample photos can be seen here, including an ISO 25600 one.

First images from the Fujifilm X-Pro1 (via Photo Rumors)


In other news, Fujifilm has revealed that it has sold roughly 100,000 X100 cameras through 2011.


Image credit: Photograph by Michael Coyne

How to Make a Million Dollars with $871, a DSLR, and Photoshop

Evan Sharboneau over at Photo Extremist shot this crazy photograph of “a room filled with an obnoxious amount of money”. It wasn’t shot with a truckload of cash, nor was it created using CGI. Instead, Sharboneau used $871 in cash — a total of just 29 separate bills. He spent 4 hours photographing the room 170 times with the money placed in different locations in each frame, and then spent 5 hours merging all the photographs together in Photoshop. You can find Sharboneu’s video tutorial on this cloning technique here, and a tutorial we published a while back here.

A Room Filled with an Obnoxious Amount of Money [Photo Extremist]


Image credit: Photograph by Evan Sharboneau

The Truth About Fractional Sensor Size Measurements

Ever wonder why camera manufacturers these days are describing often sensor sizes with fractions instead of millimeters? Roger Cicala of LensRentals explains:

[...] then we get into all of these fractional-inch-type-measurements for the smaller sensors. That measurement system originated in ancient times (the 1950s to 1980s) when vacuum tubes were used instead of CCD or CMOS sensors in video and television cameras. The image sensor was, in those days, referred to in terms of the outside diameter of the vacuum tube that contained it.

Why do manufacturers keep using such an archaic measurement? Because it helps them lie to you, of course. If you do the math 1/2.7 equals 0.37 inches, which equals 9.39 mm. But if you look at the chart above you’ll see that a 1/2.7″ sensor actually has a diagonal of 6.7 mm. Why? Because, of course, a thick glass tube used to surround the sensors. So they calculate the sensor size as if the glass tube was still included. Makes perfect sense to a marketing person who wants to make their sensor seem larger than it is. What sounds better: 1/2.7″ or ‘less than 10% the size of a full frame sensor’?

If you have a few minutes, give his entire post on sensor sizes a read — it’s quite illuminating.

Sensor Size Matters [LensRentals Blog]


Image credits: Photograph by Sphl

Ghostly Portraits Captured Using Stencils and Light-Painting

France-based photographer Fabrice Wittner has a neat project titled “Enlightened Souls” that consists of ghostly portraits created by light-painting with stencils (which are themselves created from actual portraits). Wittner first started the project in May 2011 after the earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand.

I first thought of it as an artistic and morale contribution to the 6.3 quake’s aftermath. I used stencils to paint enlightened characters to remember human losses and to show the spirit of a wouned city. It turned out to be an intersting way to share ideas and feelings about society and life. After all, this is what street art is made for.

After completing his Christchurch series, he turned his attention to creating portraits of Vietnam’s village children in the country’s capital city.
Read more…

5.4 Million Dot Electronic Viewfinder to Make Real Life Look Lame

While many photographers swear by optical viewfinders, it’s clear that much of the camera industry is shifting over to electronic — or hybrid — ones to offer high-tech features such as overlaid information displays. Thankfully, many of the old problems that existed with EVFs (e.g. low resolution) are starting to disappear. Case in point: French company MicroOLED has just announced a new microdisplay that packs 5.4 million dots into the highest pixel density viewfinder ever seen. To put that into perspective, the highly-reviewed viewfinder found in the latest Sony mirrorless cameras are only 2.4-million dots. MicroOLED is said to be targeting professional cameras with the display — as well as military and medical purposes.

(via Imaging Resource via Wired)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

Read more…

Epic Slow Motion Footage Shot with a Canon 550D

17-year-old filmmaking student Sacha Powell shot this powerful slow motion film using a $500 Canon 550D/T2i, 50mm f/1.8, 18-55mm kit lens, and Sigma 70-300mm. On the software side he utilized Premiere Pro CS5, After Effects CS5.5, and Twixtor for faux slow motion. Impressive.

(via Fstoppers)

Introducing the Instant Photo Pendant Necklace!

Say hello to the latest item in the PetaPixel Store: the Instant Photo Pendant Necklace! This beautiful pendant is designed to look exactly like a 1-inch tall Polaroid picture. Insert your favorite 0.8-inch square photos through a slot in the side, and keep it safe and snug with a clear plastic square (included). The copper and iron pendant is coated with white and comes with a silver-colored 18-inch chain. Buy one while supplies last for just $10 from our store (shipping is free for US residents).
Read more…

Portraits of Abandoned Cars Taken From the Back Seat

Photographer Alicia Rius bases much of her work around searching for “hidden treasures”. One particular series is titled “From the back seat of my car”, and consists of unplanned photographs taken from the back of abandoned cars. She writes,

The first car I found was the red one. Then, another then day while I was driving, I saw another abandoned car. I never looked for them, actually, I think they found me. I was thinking in a way to immortalize their beauty and turn the tin in something romantic. So I decided to step in… and OMG, that was really tricky! But after fighting with the spiders, the bees, hurting myself to try to squeeze my body in such a small place… it was worth it.

Read more…

How to Make a DIY Camera Wristlet

Elizabeth Giorgi of Being Geek Chic made this step-by-step video tutorial teaching how to make a stylish DIY camera wristlet using some fabric and iron-on fusible.

DIY Weekend: Camera wristlet (via DIYP via Make)