Posts Published in December 2011

Photographer Promotes New Site with QR Code Made from Ordinary Objects

QR codes have become an extremely popular way of linking to digital things from the physical world, and more and more businesses are displaying them in order to direct customers to their websites. Photographer David Sykes (whom we previously featured here) decided to take advantage of the craze to promote his new website and blog. Instead of an ordinary QR code, however, he decided to create an 8-foot square model of the code using things such as boots, calculators, briefcases, boomboxes, and champagne bottles. He then photographed the code on film and mailed out limited edition prints.
Read more…

Will It Blend? Clever Advertisement for the Polaroid Z340

Polaroid and Chase Jarvis teamed up to create this “Will It Blend“-style advertisement for the the Polaroid Z340 instant digital camera. It’s a clever idea, but poor cameras!

PetaPixel Photography Gift Guide 2011

Christmas is almost upon us, and for the second straight year PetaPixel’s gift guide comes incredibly late. Think of it as a general guide to nifty photo-related gifts that have emerged over the past year rather than a Christmas gift guide — after all, gifts are great to receive year-round, right?
Read more…

Slow Motion Comparison: 500, 1000, 2500, 5000 and 10000 FPS

Gav of The Slow Mo Guys made this interesting video comparing different high-speed camera frame rates. Using a Phantom HD camera, he films coffee mugs shattering on pavement at 500, 1000, 2500, 5000, and 10000 frames per second.

Turn Your Photos into Wrapping Paper

Want to go beyond using ordinary wrapping paper for your Christmas gifts? You can make some DIY wrapping paper out of photographs. Print out your favorite photos at home onto ordinary copy paper for smaller presents, and tape multiple sheets together for larger packages.

DIY Photo Wrapping Paper [Photojojo]

Use a Christmas Wreath Case to Protect Your Beauty Dish

Beauty dishes are pricey, and so are dedicated cases for carrying them around. If you want a cheap and simple way to protect your dish, LA-based photographer Mariusz Jeglinski suggests buying a Christmas wreath bag for less than $10. The shape works nicely for dishes, and you can add some extra padding to the case if you want added protection.

(via Strobist)


Image credits: Photographs by Mariusz Jeglinski/Strobist and M. Nguyen

How to Fold an Origami Pinhole Camera Out of Photographic Paper

Here’s a neat idea for photographic experimentation: create a pinhole camera out of photographic paper by folding it into an origami box with the light-sensitive side on the inside. The hole that is used to blow the box into its shape is also used to expose the inside to the outside world. After exposing it, simply unfold it and process it using standard developer and fix.

(via DIYP)

Teenage Photographer Wins Settlement From London Police

16-year-old photographer Jules Mattsson has won a settlement from the London Metropolitan Police after being stopped and detained last year while photographing the Armed Forces Day parade. Here’s Mattsson’s account of what happened:

I was detained by Police in Romford after taking an image of a cadet unit who were about to march in a massive parade in front of thousands of people with cameras. I was told it was an offence to photograph a child, then an offence to photograph the military, then an offence to photograph the police then that I was a threat under the terrorism act. I was frog marched with my arm painfully twisted away from the public eye and any witnesses and pushed down a set of stairs. The police illegally tried to take my details on several occasions also. [#]

In addition to the financial settlement paid to Mattsson early last week, the police department has also apologized for its actions.

(via PressGazette via Pixiq)

Shooting and Compositing an Outdoor Architectural Photo

Here’s a brief video in which Los Angeles-based photographer Mike Kelley shares his technique for lighting large architectural spaces using small flash units. Kelley captures hundreds of photographs of each scene and the combines them afterwards in Photoshop. Back in September we shared an interesting time-lapse walkthrough by Kelley showing how he shoots home exteriors with the same technique.

(via Fstoppers)

Britons Drunk in 76 Percent of Tagged Facebook Photos, Survey Finds

Now here’s an absolutely bizarre statistic if it’s actually true: 76 percent of Facebook photos with tagged Britons show the subjects in some state of drunkenness. Photo book service MyMemory.com surveyed 1,781 Britons over the age of 18, asking them to estimate the percentage of their pics that showed them under the influence of alcohol. A quarter of those respondents also said that their privacy settings allowed the general public to view their tagged images.

(via Telegraph via Digital Trends)


Image credit: Drunk by Oneras