PetaPixel

Running Through Mud Puddles at 4000fps

Here’s another beautiful example of why you don’t need to shell out $100,000 for a pro-grade high speed camera when you can use just a simple DSLR — in this case it was a Canon T2i — and Twixtor. David HJ. Lindberg writes,

I used a Canon 550D T2i to create a Phantom camera look, but with a much lower budget. All I used was my 550D, my lens and Twixtor. Of course the Phantom camera makes better results, but compared with the prices, I think Twixtor is totally worth a try.

The video was shot using the super cheap Canon 50mm f/1.8 Mark II lens and was converted from 60fps to 4000fps afterward.

(via Doobybrain)


 
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  • Gereon

    stunning!

  • http://twitter.com/JohnMilleker John Milleker

    Interesting, very morphy but if used sparingly in a production I’m sure very few would notice.

  • Anonymous

    I agree, did you see his foot at 0:58? I think 4000fps is kind of pushing it. Still cool though I didn’t even know you could do this

  • Anonymous

    What is the fastest shutter speed you can get on the T2i?

  • http://www.charlesrstafford.com Chasstaf

    Pretty good quality, I agree, used sparingly like he did, very few would notice

  • repetitive

    So, how many more “jumping in puddle” Twixtor videos are we going to see? I think it’s cool and all, but it seems that people are running out of ideas to use Twixtor on.

  • David HJ. Lindberg

    You can get the shutter speed to 1/4000.
    Thanks for all the comments!

  • Anonymous

    Great software, but do not depend on it to create all slow-mo videos. Look at the video at 0:40, the foot is morphed here and there. I’m not convinced it works well because it simply doesn’t know what to look for. 
    Don’t buy this software thinking it can slow down all sorts of videos, because you’ll end up regretting dearly.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FMWOZ7CEGUAFO7G4RNAEG4PFRU Roy

    You say shutter speed, I have a feeling you mean frame rate, which would be 60fps for video.

  • Anonymous

    No, I meant shutter speed. Faster shutter speed in video means sharper individual frames, which would be better for this kind of software.

  • Jamie Sutor

    What shutter speed did you use? Was it 1/4000 ? Because when I’m testing this out it just comes out grainy for me. Is that normal? Great work!