PetaPixel

How to Make a Wooden AC Adapter for a Battery-Only Digital Camera

Many digital cameras are battery-only, and can’t be directly connected to an outlet for an infinite source of power. That’s ordinarily not a problem, but can become an issue if you attempt to do things like time-lapse imagery, for which the camera needs to stay powered and perfectly stationary for extended periods of time. That was the problem faced by Instructables member txoof with his Olympus E520. Handy with electronics and woodworking, he decided to build his own AC/DC interface for the camera, crafting a wooden mold that acts as a wall-powered “battery”.

If you have the same problem and aren’t afraid of sockets and buzz saws, check out his tutorial for instructions on how to do this yourself.

Wall (mains) Power for an Olympus E-510 (via Lifehacker)


 
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  • http://twitter.com/Jeoncs Jeoncs

    I don’t recommend doing this at all unless you like voided warranties accompanied with declined warranty service and/or electrical shock resulting in death.

  • http://twitter.com/Transhawn Tran-Shawn Yu

    how wood the manufacturer know….?

  • http://blog.wingtangwong.com/ Wing Wong

    The more I see these, the more I think it’s time to break out the sillicone mould and resin casting kit and make me battery shapes… been wanting to do an external battery/AC adapter pack. There are are plenty of wall warts sitting around that can output the power required.

  • Anonymous

    I charge thee, try this silicon experiment. 

  • http://twitter.com/zak Zak Henry

    People need to stop worrying about <24VDC power and start hacking more

  • theart

    The camera is probably already out of warranty, and you could lick those contacts without death resulting. If this scares you, I don’t know how you make it out of the house every day.

  • theart

    I remember doing something like this a long time ago to a Sony Discman with a bum AC socket. I just spliced a pair of alligator clips to the wall wart lead and hooked them up to the battery contacts. Worked great if I didn’t move it too much.