Posts Published in October 2011

Colorful Star Trails Reflected in a Lake

Night photographer Ben Canales made this image by stacking together roughly 50 different exposures in order to show all of the star trails across the sky. Regarding the color seen in the stars, Canales writes,

The different colors of the star streaks are from the “temperature” of light that the stars burn at. Just like a candle gives and orange light, and a gas stove burns blue- the stars in our sky shine all different sorts of colored light.

A while back, we featured a video tutorial by Canales on how to photograph the night sky. Give that video a look, find a still lake on a clear night, and you can make one of these photographs yourself!

Walnut and Cherry Wood Coverings for the Fujifilm X100

Remember the light brown leather X100 special edition announced by Fujifilm a couple of days ago? While those might come with a unique limited edition serial number, the look apparently isn’t as unique. As a commenter pointed out, it appears to be a covering offered by a shop named Aki-Asahi Custom Camera Coverings. There are quite a few styles in addition to that look (which is named “Lizard Ochre”), including a couple of beautiful wood coverings crafted from walnut and cherry wood.
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How a Composite Sports Photo is Made

In this video, commercial photographer Jay P. Morgan walks through how he went about shooting a composite sports photograph of Mexican soccer player Rafael Márquez.

We were going to shoot several shots that would need to freeze him in mid air as he kicked the ball. We had limited time with him so it was necessary that things were planed out and ready to go when he arrived. We took two Hensel speed max heads that have the fastest flash duration of any mono block head available. The goal was to use them as our key lights and freeze his action in mid air. We shot background plates the day before at the ruins outside of Mexico City for him to be retouched into. The idea being famous soccer players in action shots at different iconic sites of Mexico. [#]

A video walkthrough of the post-production can be found over on Facebook.

(via Fstoppers)

Nikon D800 Announcement Reportedly Called Off Due to Thai Floods

Japanese camera site digicame-info is reporting that an upcoming announcement of a D700 successor (possibly the D800) has been cancelled due to the ongoing flooding in Thailand, and that Nikon’s product supply has nearly come to a standstill — affecting existing products in addition to upcoming ones. Even if the D800 is being manufactured in Japan like the D700 is, some components may be produced in Nikon’s flood-damaged factory.

(via digicame-info via Foto Actualidad)

Display a Giant Photo on Your Wall Using Wooden Boards

Inspired by Caleb Ungewitter’s giant poster project, Andy Beckmann decided to try his hand at making a nicer version. Instead of attaching prints to the wall directly, Beckmann purchased 36 210x297mm wooden boards to mount the prints on (the photo was split into smaller prints using PosteRazor). The result is a more durable and professional looking display that can be easily reused in a different location.
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Students Send Nikon D300s to Space in a Beer Cooler

Sending cameras to the edges of space on a weather balloon has become a pretty popular activity as of late, but up to now people were mostly sending up cell phones, compact cameras, and small HD video cameras (e.g. GoPros). While those devices are light and relatively cheap, the quality of images produced isn’t the best.

Well, Texas Tech students Erich Leeth and Terry Presley recently decided to step things up a notch by using a Nikon D300s and Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens for their space photography. Their craft, which consisted of a 22-foot weather balloon filled with helium and a styrofoam beer cooler purchased from Walmart, rose to an estimated 100K feet before the balloon popped. A parachute then brought the pricey gear safely back down to Earth. The entire project took just 13 days from start to finish, and the duo managed to capture some pretty neat photos from the edge of space.

Cygnus Project on Flickr (via DIYPhotography via PopPhoto)

Time-Lapse Shows the Beauty of Iceland During Perpetual Golden Hour

The “midnight sun” is a natural phenomenon that occurs in summer months near the Earth’s poles where the sun doesn’t set and is visible 24 hours a day. During these times, the sun travels horizontally across the horizon throughout the night, causing the landscape to be bathed in an extended “golden hour” light.

Back in June, photographer Joe Capra traveled across Iceland for 17 days, covering some 2,900 miles and capturing 38,000 photographs using two Canon 5D Mark IIs and a Canon 7D. He then combined the stills into this time-lapse video showing the beauty of that country during the midnight sun.

(via planet5D)

Unseen Photos From the Sinking of the Titanic Emerge After 99 Years

The 100 year anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic will come in April of next year, and auction houses are already seeing a spike in the number of artifacts from the disaster being put up for sale. Among them are a set of previously unseen photographs made the morning after the sinking, which show the rescue ships, lifeboats, and an icy Atlantic ocean.
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Want to Take Better Action Shots? Try Slowing Down Time

So this is how some photographers always manage to capture awesome action shots… Now if only Neo or Max Payne would lead a photography workshop on how to activate “bullet time”.

(via ISO 1200)

Nikon Lens Scope Converter Turns Lenses into Telescopes

The Nikon Lens Scope Converter is a rare accessory that attaches to the back of Nikon lenses, turning them into telescopes. You can sometimes find them listed on eBay for around $230. They’re designed for AF D-era lenses that have mechanical aperture rings, but you can “hack” your G lenses to be compatible by using a piece of plastic to keep the aperture blades in the open position.

Furthermore, you can mount the convert onto a Micro lens to make a microscope. Use it on a 105mm Micro lens, and you’ll have yourself a handheld 25x microscope!

How to convert your Nikon lens into a telescope or a microscope [Nikon Rumors]


Image credit: Photograph by Fabrizio Belardetti and used with permission