Posts Published in August 2011

Photographer Makes “Chlorophyll Prints” Using Leaves and Sunlight

Photographer Binh Danh observed one summer that there was a difference in color between grass under a water hose and the grass directly exposed to sunlight. He then began to experiment with combining photography with photosynthesis, and came up with what he calls “chlorophyll prints” — photographs printed onto leaves using the sun.
Read more…

Shooting at f/90 with a 70-Pound Camera on 504-Square-Inch Film

YouTube user destinw — the guy behind the chicken steadicam (and worth subscribing to) — recently met up with photographer Darren Samuelson and his massive homemade large format camera. In this video, we’re given another look into how this one-of-a-kind camera works, as Samuelson photographs the Saturn V rocket at the US Space and Rocket Center. Check out some of his amazing ultra-large format photos here.

More Fujifilm FinePix X10 Photos Leaked

Rumors about Fujifilm’s upcoming “mini-X100″ is heating up. The word on the street is that the camera will be announced on Thursday, and that it will officially be called the “X10″ rather than the “X50″. There were also some new photos of the camera leaked onto the web in addition to the blurry Promaster catalog photo we shared last week.
Read more…

Pro DSLR with Cheapo Glass versus Cheapo DSLR with Pro Glass

It’s a pretty common question: if you had to choose, would you rather have a top-of-the-line DSLR with a cheap lens or an entry-level body with pro glass? Kai of DigitalRev attempts to answer the question through a hands on experiment in this humorous and educational video.

His conclusion is that unless you need to specific high end features of pro bodies (e.g. full frame sensor, high ISO performance, fast focus and burst shooting), then you’re probably better off going with a cheaper camera and more expensive lenses. Lenses hold their value much better than camera bodies, and there isn’t too big of a difference in image quality these days between entry level and pro DSLRs — especially when using high quality glass.

(via Reddit)

Photographer Raising $270,000 for a Camera That Can See through Walls

In 1505, Leonardo da Vinci painted a vast mural in Florence’s town hall titled “The Battle of Anghiari” — believed to be one of his greatest works. After being on display for more than 40 years, the unfinished painting was lost when the hall underwent renovations and new murals by Giorgio Vasari were added. There are no known records explaining what happened to the piece, but many people believe that it is currently hidden behind one particular mural called “Battle of Marciano in Val di Chiana”.

Photographer David Yoder began photographing this mystery for the National Geographic starting in 2007, and soon began looking for a way to photograph the lost painting through the existing mural. He’s currently attempting to raise $266,500 through Kickstarter to develop a camera to do this.
Read more…

Court Upholds Citizens’ Right to Turn Cameras on Police Officers

Boston lawyer Simon Glik was arrested on October 1, 2007 when he used his cell phone to record officers making a drug arrest, and later sued the city and the officers for violating his rights. After the officers tried to having the lawsuit dismissed on the basis of qualified immunity, a Federal Appeals Court denied the motion last week and ruled that filming and photographing police is in fact protected by the First Amendment. They also note that the rights extend not just to professional news gatherers, but ordinary citizens as well:

[…] changes in technology and society have made the lines between private citizen and journalist exceedingly difficult to draw. The proliferation of electronic devices with video-recording capability means that many of our images of current events come from bystanders with a ready cell phone or digital camera rather than a traditional film crew, and news stories are now just as likely to be broken by a blogger at her computer as a reporter at a major newspaper. Such developments make clear why the news-gathering protections of the First Amendment cannot turn on professional credentials or status.

This is great news for photographers’ rights (in the United States, at least).

Opinion No. 10-176 (via UniversalHUB via A Photo Editor)


Image credit: gavel by s_falkow

PillowMob Turns Portraits into Pillows

PillowMob is a new service that transforms photos of heads into puffy pillow heads. In addition to human faces, you can also use the face of your beloved pet. They cost $25 each with free shipping — it’s currently available to US residents only, but the company may begin shipping internationally soon.


Thanks for the tip, Jeremy!

Nikon’s Curious Policy on User Manuals Has Some Customers Grumbling

Apparently Nikon has decide to save some trees (and shipping weight) by no longer including user manuals in some of its digital cameras. Since most people likely never touch the manuals anyway, it’s not really a problem, but the company’s draconian stance towards downloadable instruction manuals has some customers grumbling.
Read more…

Clever Wedding Photo Booth Made Using a Canon T3i

We’ve seen DSLR photo booth projects before, but usually they’re just simple ways for guests at an event to take self-portraits of themselves. Kevin over at I Dream In Code actually made a fancy photo booth for his brother’s wedding that prints out a nice keepsake for guests:

It is an Arduino connected to a Staples easy button. When pressed, it starts the sequence of taking 4 pictures on the Canon T3i, triggered through the 2.5mm earphone jack.

The pictures are wirelessly transferred over an adhoc network using an EyeFi Pro SD card. On the laptop, it is looking in a directory for 4 pictures, takes the 4 of them, combines them into one photo along with a picture of Andrew and Jenn, and prints it out.

The entire process from pressing the Easy Button to having the photo pop out takes about 1 minute and 30 seconds. Check out his blog post for more of the technical details.

Automated Photobooth (via Reddit)

Sony’s Translucent Mirror May Reduce Detail in Photos by up to 5%

You’ve probably read plenty of articles touting the benefits of Sony’s translucent mirror technology (e.g. high fps, AF for video, quietness, etc…), but what about the cons? One of the main downsides to having a translucent mirror is that the light hitting the sensor passes through an additional layer (the translucent mirror), which reduces the amount of light and the image quality.

Ray over at TheSyberSite attempted to quantify how much the mirror affects the resulting image quality by removing the mirror on his A55 and comparing the resulting photos. He confirmed that about 1/2 stop of light is lost, and estimates that 5% of the detail in each shot is lost due to the mirror. Head on over to the article for some side-by-side comparisons.

Secrets of the Sony A55 (via sonyalpharumors)