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Awesome Course on Digital Photography

Marc Levoy, the Stanford professor behind the “Frankencamera” project, teaches a course on digital photography called CS 178. The class website is a treasure trove for anyone looking for some great free education in photography:

An introduction to the scientific, artistic, and computing aspects of digital photography – how digital cameras work, how to take good pictures using them, and how to manipulate these pictures afterwards. Topics include lenses and optics, light and sensors, optical effects in nature, perspective and depth of field, sampling and noise, the camera as a computing platform, image processing and editing, history of photography, and computational photography. We’ll also survey the history of photography and look at the work of famous photographers.

Think you know all there is to know about digital photography? Try answering these 10 final exam review questions (answers can be found here). Leave a comment telling us how many you got right!

CS 178 – Digital Photography (via Reddit)


 
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  • Dominique

    I don’t completely agree with the answer to question 3. Mostly true, but not always. Luminescent objects emit light with a different wavelength than the light they are illuminated with.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescence

  • wickerprints

    I missed 3 questions:  #5, #6, and #7.  Everything else I answered correctly.

  • Matt

    I missed three (2, 4, 7) and on at least one I guessed correctly. Pretty much like my college career, actually.

  • Matt

    I missed three (2, 4, 7) and on at least one I guessed correctly. Pretty much like my college career, actually.

  • Lyle Verbilion

    I blew 6, 8, & 10.
    Anybody not miss 3?

  • http://www.facebook.com/inwardstudio Neal Carpenter

    5.  I really thought I’d do better.  Nice test.

  • http://www.facebook.com/inwardstudio Neal Carpenter

    5.  I really thought I’d do better.  Nice test.

  • Tom M.

    missed 3,4 and 6. I got suckered on 4 for some reason; I’ve never heard the term chromaticity diagram so 6 was a bit of a guess; and well, 3 just messed me up.

  • http://twitter.com/ilkersen İlker Şen

    The answer to #3 is wrong as someone mentioned. Fluorescence is one example, but it’s not reflectance (it’s re-emitting light), so that’s not why I think the answer is wrong. One can have reflective surfaces that also refract so that the reflected light is of a different wavelength. e.g. mirror in a pool, where the mirror plane is NOT parallel to the water surface. Or any one of the multi-thinfilm surfaces.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Daniel-Austin-Hoherd/576367461 Daniel Austin Hoherd

    I didn’t get any wrong!  …because I didn’t answer any of them. :P

  • Bruce Farnsworth

    Stumbled on your post. Hey guys, once you’ve studied the properties of light and know the Scheimpflug rule, consider breaking away for a summer tour in pure aesthetics with Raw Rainforest Immersion Photography Tours where my editorial work is based! Check out http://www.brucefarnsworth.com, click on Workshops tab.  Best of luck with your studies! 

  • Somesh

    lol! =D