PetaPixel

Ambushing Strangers in Hollywood with a Canon 5D and Handheld Flash

Street photographer Bruce Gilden has a pretty distinct style of getting into strangers’ faces and firing off a flash held in his other hand. Eric Kim — who recently started doing street photography full-time — created this behind-the-scenes video showing himself employing Gilden’s trademark style, though instead of a Leica he uses a Canon 5D. The lens he’s using is a Canon 24mm f/2.8, and the flash is a YN-560.


 
  • http://twitter.com/Basbeeky Bas ter Beek

    I have the feeling this guy hasn’t bumped into one who really DIDN’t like to get his picture taken. I think he is too ignorant to see it.
    Won’t blame him, if this is the way he earns his money…..

  • http://www.facebook.com/jroalkvam Jostein Roalkvam

    Meh, didn’t like any of his pictures.

  • Ryan S

    Thanks! :)

    But yes, agreed: My sample on flickr is not simply from one outing, so who knows what quality of work Erick can produce over time. I’ll look for his portfolio later.

  • http://twitter.com/roblarosa Rob LaRosa

    Yeah, except one is legal and the other illegal.

  • http://twitter.com/roblarosa Rob LaRosa

    Yeah, except one is legal and the other illegal.

  • http://twitter.com/roblarosa Rob LaRosa

    Yeah, except one is legal and the other illegal.

  • http://twitter.com/roblarosa Rob LaRosa

    Yeah, except one is legal and the other illegal.

  • http://www.facebook.com/xsportseeker Renato Murakami

    The good thing about what Eric Kim did with this video here is provoke discussion.
    I think it’s time we have some open and public guidelines on photography etiquette.
    Personally, I’m not completely against stuff like that, but it needs at least a purpose.
    And it needs a purpose because it’s rude and might be offensive to some.
    The least a public photo might cause is some justified worries/questions.
    The least a photographer should do is answer and talk about those. You just don’t go running around shooting people. Might not be illegal, but then again it’s borderline harassment.
    And the thing is, if it becomes a trend, it soon will be classified as.
    No one wants to walk around on the streets having to be worried about photographers coming around, taking pics of them and then publishing on some video on YouTube, art gallery or whatever.
    We all know the harms that might come from the permanent Internet memory.
    How many horror stories we know of people who had photos or videos leaked or naivelly posted on the internet only to be mocked or used as a targetboard?

    But you see, there are cases when such behaviour is justified. When you have a project involving the area and the project requires tons of shooting without time for consent, for instance.
    This, of course, doesn’t seem to be one of them. And “I like your hat” certainly isn’t enough to justify shoving a camera and flash at someone…

  • http://www.facebook.com/xsportseeker Renato Murakami

    The good thing about what Eric Kim did with this video here is provoke discussion.
    I think it’s time we have some open and public guidelines on photography etiquette.
    Personally, I’m not completely against stuff like that, but it needs at least a purpose.
    And it needs a purpose because it’s rude and might be offensive to some.
    The least a public photo might cause is some justified worries/questions.
    The least a photographer should do is answer and talk about those. You just don’t go running around shooting people. Might not be illegal, but then again it’s borderline harassment.
    And the thing is, if it becomes a trend, it soon will be classified as.
    No one wants to walk around on the streets having to be worried about photographers coming around, taking pics of them and then publishing on some video on YouTube, art gallery or whatever.
    We all know the harms that might come from the permanent Internet memory.
    How many horror stories we know of people who had photos or videos leaked or naivelly posted on the internet only to be mocked or used as a targetboard?

    But you see, there are cases when such behaviour is justified. When you have a project involving the area and the project requires tons of shooting without time for consent, for instance.
    This, of course, doesn’t seem to be one of them. And “I like your hat” certainly isn’t enough to justify shoving a camera and flash at someone…

  • guest

    indeed, I wonder.  I love photography, and I don’t even mind folks taking my picture (although me myself, I don’t like street photography to much, but if someone wants a picture of me, I’m fine with that).  However, if someone ran up to me, popped a flash in my face and snapped a photo like this, I’d be pretty ticked off even if it was Adams or Weston or _________ (insert famous street photographer here, as I’m not familiar with street photogs).

  • Wisk

    Annoying, aggressive , and also, a bad copy

  • howard_g

    Hey Kim – get a life – your own.

    Bruce Gilden does this with a real camera, a Leica and talent and in NYC. He actually has commitment, balls, great pictures, in focus and artistry with the people he shoots.

    You’re a plagiarising, no talent, smiling buffoon. Fear not, for one day someone won’t bother to ask you to delete the picture, they simply will delete you. So prepare yourself with some KY jelly for the day, if you’re lucky, someone puts your face into a wall and the camera up, well, it’s your personal little darkroom – you get the picture, or not.

    I’ve been shooting for over 50 years and if you took picture of my kids or me unannounced or without a Release … think: swinging a 5D in a high overhead arc into something solid. “Oops he tripped officer”.

  • Anonymous

    Brilliant comment. LOL. It’s hard eating soup while laughing.

  • Anonymous

    Brilliant comment. LOL. It’s hard eating soup while laughing.

  • Anonymous

    The trouble is people don’t know they are fair game. Not everybody understands their rights so you can’t say that. 

    The guy said you need permission, and you should get it, not because of any legal basis but because it’s good manners.

  • Anonymous

    The trouble is people don’t know they are fair game. Not everybody understands their rights so you can’t say that. 

    The guy said you need permission, and you should get it, not because of any legal basis but because it’s good manners.

  • http://twitter.com/ianjmatt Ian Matthews

    It’s just not very good street photography. It doesn’t tell a story or inform on the human condition. It is just lots or surprised or suspicious people looking into his lens.

  • http://twitter.com/ianjmatt Ian Matthews

    I’m not defending the douchebag here at all, but do you need a release in the US? In the UK if you’re on public property you have no rights over any image taken of you.

  • Wallerus

    This is a spoof video right? I’m fairly certain Eric doesn’t do this approach as a serious approach to his photography. Now me on the other hand, would never do this.

  • http://twitter.com/keithwoodhall keith woodhall

    WOW! What a bunch of amazing responses to this video. Haha. 

    Firstly, I highly doubt this guy shoots like this all the time. I think this video was meant to be more of an exhibition. 

    Secondly, I would rather see this than the same cliche washed out portrait over and over again. I would rather see something shitty and different than something that has been done 1,000 times before. 

    I never really cared for Bruce Gilden anyways and after watching both of these people at work, Gilden, IMO, was far more obnoxious. 

  • Marquisde

    Arrogant arse! He took a shot of a young girl and mum getting out of their car. If it was my kid, the camera would be broken in a sec if he just walked off when I called him back. Disrespectful, average images, ass! Although I recognize this is a SF style in think its fake in that it engineers a reaction rather than captures life as it occurs.

  • phrenzel

    total douchebag