PetaPixel

Can You Figure Out the Secret Technique Used in this Timelapse?

Ordinarily if there’s movement in a timelapse video, it’s constrained to a small area because a dolly or crane system was used to change the position of the camera small distances between shots. The folks at T-RECS came up with a special way to introduce large distance movements into timelapse shots, but are keeping mum on how they did it. Check out the showreel above and see if you can figure out their secret technique.

(via Fstoppers)


 
  • Anonymous

    It’s on a wire?

  • Bee

    Probably a high frame rate and very slow movement of the crane ?

  • Larisa Allen

    My thought as well.

  • http://sljonesdigital.com SLJonesDigital

    Stop motion tilt-shift applied post-process.

  • http://www.facebook.com/happywaffle Kevin Miller

    Tip: the actual time-lapse footage doesn’t start until 45 seconds in.

    As for the technique, it doesn’t seem like the hardest problem to solve; just “train” the camera, probably by running the route once at full-speed with a human pointing it, then run back along the same track and a computer knows where to point and when to take a picture. Technically impressive, but not wizardry or anything.

  • Anonymous

    My guess is it’s on a track with a motor driving it.

  • Anonymous

    The requirement is that the camera framing remains steady between shots. 

    Some sort of computer-assisted camera control to control the framing seems the most plausible route. 
    Given such control, yes, the cam could be on a cable, or a crane, or whatever. The source of the movement wouldn’t matter, so long as the precision framing control was operational.Problem w/ this theory is its complexity of execution.

  • Anonymous

    Looks to me they’re going to try to sell equipment.  It could be anything, but I think most likely some kind of crane or a line.  Maybe even a balloon with controlling guy wires.  With additional controls of some kind, be it purely mechanical or electronic and mechanical.

  • Anonymous

    Looks to me they’re going to try to sell equipment.  It could be anything, but I think most likely some kind of crane or a line.  Maybe even a balloon with controlling guy wires.  With additional controls of some kind, be it purely mechanical or electronic and mechanical.

  • Anonymous

    The way some of the pans dip lends credibility to the wire theory but I wonder if a stabilization unit on an RC helicopter might produce the same effect and achieve the height/distance seen in some of the shots.  I tried to see if there were hints int he reflections of the windows/pool but those weren’t any help to me!

  • http://twitter.com/havecamera David Coleman

    More than one camera on a bar? Like the time slice technique, but instead of having shutters go simultaneously, have them set at intervals. Like this: http://www.digitalair.com/techniques/. All of the sequences seem to be about same distance traveled and all roughly in a straight line.

  • Osiris

    http://vimeo.com/18651053

    ^ this is great stuff!

  • http://twitter.com/denMAR Dennis Marciniak

    I would modify a cherry picker to move at 0.25 km/h and stabilize the camera in production and then in post as well. Much quicker than hanging a wire – that’s the route I would take anyway. 

  • Bernardo Mancebo

    It’s using The new Warp stabilizer from Adobe Premier in CS 5.5

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dario-Lalli/1587220926 Dario Lalli

    The method is half shoot technique and half post processing:
    1) they shoot every frame with a tripod, moving it forward each time with constant distance; camera is always pointed to a particular spot (a window, a tower, etc) to avoid excessive change between one frame and the other. these changes are caused by the need to frame the picture again every time the tripod moves.
    2) the picture sequence obtained is still a little “shaky” so it needs to be stabilized with the “warp stabilizer”, introduced with Adobe After Effects 5.5 (youtube for examples).

    That’s it….

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dario-Lalli/1587220926 Dario Lalli

    The method is half shoot technique and half post processing:
    1) they shoot every frame with a tripod, moving it forward each time with constant distance; camera is always pointed to a particular spot (a window, a tower, etc) to avoid excessive change between one frame and the other. these changes are caused by the need to frame the picture again every time the tripod moves.
    2) the picture sequence obtained is still a little “shaky” so it needs to be stabilized with the “warp stabilizer”, introduced with Adobe After Effects 5.5 (youtube for examples).

    That’s it….

  • Aseemdomaini

    Its looks like a wire ,  already there such are systems used for telecasting sport events , they just did a time lapse of it. 

  • http://twitter.com/jeremiahjw jeremiahjw

    A wire, really long dolly with a pan head, or a really long jib. 

  • http://twitter.com/agfnov Aleksey Agafonov

    huh? this is far better http://vimeo.com/16063824

  • http://ro200000.com Ro200000

    warp stabilizer or similar !

  • http://twitter.com/Devereauxprints Ed Devereaux

    I admit, I cheated and watched the second video. 

  • http://twitter.com/Devereauxprints Ed Devereaux

    I admit, I cheated and watched the second video. 

  • Olly

    All the shots seem to be in a straight line with a remote panning head to keep the subject centre of frame. Looks a lot like the high wire stuff we’re used to seeing in sport.  I assume you could stick an additional small video camera on the rig with a ‘live view’ feed to the operator below to ensure all the shots are framed up properly.  Maybe they’ve written some software to smooth it all out and compensate for wind and wobbles?    The end result is a bit underwhelming though. Timelapse really benefits from subtle camera moves. On this scale there’s too much for the eye to take in. 

  • Confuzzlebot

    On a wire or a train/track due to the way some of the shots swoon around. 

    Anyone see the funky camera angle on the Silverstone Formula 1? It was a wire camera that was controlled via remote device. Gave some fantastic close range shots of the action! 

  • Anonymous

    The thing that’s common to all of them is that there’s an architectural element that the camera seems to be “targeted” to. So One way to do it would be to have the camera do a pattern recognition (like a tracking program would do) and correct (through software and hardware actually connected to the camera) and line up the camera before it shoots the next frame. You’ll notice that when the target get’s obscured, they cut to the next shot…..

    Or it could be a post process….   ;-)

  • Godsanimator

    My guess is that is 3D Camera mapping to basic 3D geometry.

  • Godsanimator

    My guess is that is 3D Camera mapping to basic 3D geometry.

  • Whattheduck

    Definitely using After Effects 5.5 Warp stabilizer and a slow moving vehicle. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1514979480 Ryan Hemenway

    Cable Cam. like in football. simple. cheap. easy

  • Bartstar101

    The Canon EOS 7D can shoot at 60fps. This produces smooth slow motion. In post-production take out extra frames to get time lapse effect.
    Use 2 or more tracks aligned together,  when the camera reaches the end of the 1st track move it in front of the 2nd track and continue until you get your complete extra long tracking shot.

    Here is some of the equipment that they used:
    2x Canon EOS 7D 
    Kessler Crane: 3f Cineslider, Turntable, 12f ShuttlePod System, Revolution Head, 2x Oracle Controller, K-Pod + Hercules 2.0 
    Vocas MB250 mattebox (ND 0.6 or Polarizer, Graduated Filter) 
    Tokina 11-16 
    EF-S 15-85 IS 
    Tokina 10-17 Fisheye

  • Bartstar101

    The Canon EOS 7D can shoot at 60fps. This produces smooth slow motion. In post-production take out extra frames to get time lapse effect.
    Use 2 or more tracks aligned together,  when the camera reaches the end of the 1st track move it in front of the 2nd track and continue until you get your complete extra long tracking shot.

    Here is some of the equipment that they used:
    2x Canon EOS 7D 
    Kessler Crane: 3f Cineslider, Turntable, 12f ShuttlePod System, Revolution Head, 2x Oracle Controller, K-Pod + Hercules 2.0 
    Vocas MB250 mattebox (ND 0.6 or Polarizer, Graduated Filter) 
    Tokina 11-16 
    EF-S 15-85 IS 
    Tokina 10-17 Fisheye

  • Bartstar101

    The Canon EOS 7D can shoot at 60fps. This produces smooth slow motion. In post-production take out extra frames to get time lapse effect.
    Use 2 or more tracks aligned together,  when the camera reaches the end of the 1st track move it in front of the 2nd track and continue until you get your complete extra long tracking shot.

    Here is some of the equipment that they used:
    2x Canon EOS 7D 
    Kessler Crane: 3f Cineslider, Turntable, 12f ShuttlePod System, Revolution Head, 2x Oracle Controller, K-Pod + Hercules 2.0 
    Vocas MB250 mattebox (ND 0.6 or Polarizer, Graduated Filter) 
    Tokina 11-16 
    EF-S 15-85 IS 
    Tokina 10-17 Fisheye

  • Alexander Müller

    Looks to me like those aren’t photos but an animation. Maybe I’m wrong but this looks like some sort of cool 3D-software …

  • Jmvignau

    Should be done with a cable cam.

  • erlik

    http://youtu.be/bn9H8hbAAWQ

    This is apparently the direct inspiration. A camera on a dolly, with timelapse. Plus the guys at the BBC had to re-build the bit of the forest in the studio for the compositing. (Unfortunately, there’s no complete On Location on YouTube anymore.)

  • erlik

    http://youtu.be/bn9H8hbAAWQ

    This is apparently the direct inspiration. A camera on a dolly, with timelapse. Plus the guys at the BBC had to re-build the bit of the forest in the studio for the compositing. (Unfortunately, there’s no complete On Location on YouTube anymore.)

  • Dave

    A high frame rate would suggest slow motion, A low frame rate (like one per second) suggest time lapse, or the speeding up of time, like this clip.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jroalkvam Jostein Roalkvam

    First comment is these guys! :p

  • Human785

    It’s a trick! They used conventional tracks to capture the shots and are now scouring blogs for clever ideas!

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  • Leica

    My guess was deleted so I’m wondering if I got it right :)

  • Bra6y G

    They all seem to follow a path so it’s a dolly off rails. Perhaps even a van

  • Flgraphics

    it’s some sort of Harry Potter-eqsue magic

  • Flgraphics

    it’s some sort of Harry Potter-eqsue magic

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1024085348 Dominick Delli Paoli

    Music a tad too dramatic no?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1024085348 Dominick Delli Paoli

    Music a tad too dramatic no?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1024085348 Dominick Delli Paoli

    Music a tad too dramatic no?

  • Ricardo

    Clearly done with a unicorn.

  • Anonymous

    Adobe CS5.5 After Effects. Warp Stabilizer. 

  • Anonymous

    this is my guess as well.