Posts Published in July 2011

Slovenian Government Orders Photog to Take Down 11,000 Photos

If your photographs ever include the faces of strangers, you might not want to move to Slovenia. Boštjan Burger, a Slovenian photographer that shoots immersive 360° panoramas, has been ordered by the government there to take down roughly 11,000 photo from his website and delete them from his backups because they violate privacy laws. His crime? Showing faces, street addresses, and license plates in his panoramas taken in public locations. Rather than face a year in jail and a €12,000 (~$20,000) fine, photo pages on his site now read “DISPLAY OF VIRTUAL REALITY PANORAMA IS DISABLED DUE THE SLOVENIAN GOVERNMENT INSPECTION”.

Turns out living in the European Union doesn’t automatically grant you basic photographers’ rights.

(via PanoToolsNG via Facebook )


Thanks for the tip, Mark!

Remember There Are Real People on the Other Side of Those Pixels

When viewing other people’s photographs online, more often than not there’s a way to comment and share your thoughts. While photo-sharing sites seem to have nicer commenters than a site like YouTube, there are still plenty of people who seem intent on putting people down and filling the Interwebs with vitriol. If that’s you, then here’s a video you definitely need to see.

It’s an excerpt from the same book as another awesome video we shared a while back, “What’s obvious to you may be amazing to others.”

(via Reddit)

How to Read an MTF Curve to Gauge the Sharpness of a Lens

One of the things you’ve likely seen when looking at product or review pages for lenses is an MTF chart, used by manufacturers to give consumers an idea of how sharp a particular lens is. If you’ve never gotten around to learning how to interpret these charts, here’s a helpful 10-minute video tutorial on the subject. Luminous Landscape and Cambridge in Colour have great tutorials on this as well if you’re more comfortable with text-based tutorials.

Nikon Sells Branded Confections in Japan

Sure, Nikon USA finally started selling an official lens mug, but over in Nikon’s Japanese online store the company actually sells Nikon-brand confections made with ingredients that include red bean paste, sesame seeds, and chestnuts. Apparently the company has been selling these candies to its employees since 1955, and recently started offering them to non-employees as well.

Nikon Confectionery (via Foto Actualidad)

Getty Lawyers Say Google+ Terms Okay

A little update to the recent brouhaha over Google+’s Terms of Service: Tom W of Getty Images posted the above message to fellow Getty members on Flickr informing them that Getty’s lawyers have no problems with the ToS. He writes,

The important thing to watch out for in Terms of Service, and it’s the same as we’ve talked about for contests, is that whatever they do (or allow third parties to do) with the images should be in the context of the service itself, not to re-license or otherwise commercialize the images to other parties (or even the main company itself) outside of the context they’re posted for.

Certain people have argued that uploading your photos to Google+ may hurt your ability in the future to sell exclusive licenses to images. If that’s what you’re worried about, it’s probably safer to keep your photographs off the Internet completely, since every content sharing service on the Internet requires at least a license to display your photos using their service.

(via ReadWriteWeb)

The World’s Largest Photo on Display

If you’ve ever wondered how an art gallery would display the world’s largest photo taken by the world’s largest camera (and aircraft hangar), check out the above artist render of an exhibition that’s opening tomorrow at UC Riverside. The 32×111 foot photo will be wrapped around a two story atrium at the Culver Center of the Arts.

The Great Picture (via RESOURCE MAGAZINE)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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How to Add Dramatic Colors to a Photo Using Adobe Camera Raw

Here’s a helpful tutorial by Tutvid that teaches how to give your photographs dramatic colors using only Adobe Camera Raw. If you’ve started shooting RAW but haven’t played around too much with ACR, this video is also a great primer for becoming familiar with the different panels and sliders.

(via Fotografia)

Police in the US to Turn iPhone Cameras Back on Citizens

If ordinary citizens have the right to photograph police in public places, what about the other way around? That’s a question that’s sure to be asked often in the coming days, as 40 law enforcement agencies across the US are planning to use iPhones to photograph civilians for the purpose of identifying wanted perps. The system, called Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System (MORIS), costs $3,000 apiece and will be able to do facial recognition searches on a database of known criminals. Photographers’ rights will apply to cops too — police won’t be required to ask permission before snapping a photograph of your face!

(via Amateur Photographer and WSJ)

Give Your Shadow a Real Camera

Here’s a concept for you to play around with over the weekend: give your shadow a real camera to shoot with!

(via tokyo camera style)

How to Scan Film Using Your Ordinary Flatbed Scanner

If you’ve tried to scan film using an ordinary flatbed scanner as you would a piece of paper, you’ve probably discovered that it didn’t turn out very well. The reason is because film needs to be illuminated from behind, while conventional scanners capture light that’s reflected off what they’re scanning. Before you give up hope and shell out money for a film scanner, here’s some good news: you can build a cheap and simple cardboard adapter that turns any scanner into a film scanner!
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