PetaPixel

How to Turn Your Room into a Giant Camera Obscura

National Geographic created this nifty little video teaching how to turn any room with a view into a giant camera obscura. For an even more challenging project, you can try setting up some photo-sensitive paper (either photo paper or paper you paint with emulsion yourself) on the wall to shoot giant photos with your giant camera obscura.

(via Foto Actualidad)


 
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  • Mike Philippens

    Isn’t this how Johannes Vermeer (the Dutch painter) painted some of his paintings? He projected the image on a canvas and used a pencil to ‘sketch’ the scene and later he ‘painted by numbers’ ;)
    I think they showed it on Discovery some time ago. The perspective seemed wrong and this technique explained it.

  • Anonymous

    A similar effect happens in my room. There’s a tiny slit area between the black curtain and the window and just outside my the window I have a concrete light colored floor. So whenever anyone walked by, their skewed image was projected onto my ceiling via the light between the curtain and the window.

  • http://twitter.com/JamesDRobinson9 James robinson

    we have one of these set up at college, very easy way to explain the way the worlds seen through a camera’s lens to student (Y)

  • http://twitter.com/JamesDRobinson9 James robinson

    we have one of these set up at college, very easy way to explain the way the worlds seen through a camera’s lens to student (Y)

  • Smarten_Up

    Make the aperture carefully, with sharp edges. Start with maybe a one inch diameter, and make up a few cards with smaller, also well-cut apertures, and tape these over the bigger hole as your eyes adapt. Or use for the really sunny days.

    Best if your window faces a scene that gets full-on sunlight, and view at that time of day, but other times (night in the city?) could be cool too. Patience is required anytime, allow eyes to adapt. Shut off any light source in room–cell phones, pilot lights, a glowing heater, etc.

    We did this at my college in an Art History lecture room–for students to understand that a camera is just, and only, that–Italian for “room.” Everything else is an addition–variable f-stops, glass lenses, shutter, light sensitive surface like film or sensor.

    As the judge says to the lawyers when they need to discuss something outside the hearing of the jury–”Counselors, see me In Camera, please…”