PetaPixel

Use a Field Notebook to Jot Down “EXIF Data” for Your Film Photos

One of the big advantages of digital photography is that EXIF data is embedded into your images, allowing you to easily learn when and how (and more recently where) a particular photograph was captured. If you still enjoy shooting film, then a solution is to jot down notes about your photography while you’re shooting. The “Field Notebook” is a nifty little notebook published by Etsy user fabriKateShop you can use to record “EXIF data” by hand — especially useful for when you’re taking a film photography course. You can find them for about $12 each over on Etsy.

fabriKate Shop (via Photojojo)


 
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  • BaLadiNe

    Nice notebook, but if you’re pen & paper challenged and happen to have a mobile device, there’s an app for that too: iDataback http://bit.ly/ewBaom

  • Michaelrdunham

    Wouldn’t be so useful with an argus seventy five now would it (fixed focus, fixed aperture, 1 shutter speed)?? :p

  • Michaelrdunham

    Wouldn’t be so useful with an argus seventy five now would it (fixed focus, fixed aperture, 1 shutter speed)?? :p

  • http://twitter.com/zeptom Joakim Bidebo

    I just bought a small notebook for maybe $1 that I use when I shoot with manual lenses.

  • hmgphotos

    The Nikon F5 stores EXIF data internally, which then you can download. So some film cameras do have that capability, it’s just not embedded with the image.

  • Brad Maestas

    My constant companion for the last few years – a Rhodia A6 Webnotebook. The Midori system is cool, too, but I like it for everything BUT photo notes. Having a small dedicated book lets me conserve space and fill in only as much info as I need. I use abbreviations to condense it even further. The A6 size is unobtrusive in any bag or pocket and when it’s full I can file it with notes on the spine and start another. The book is a cool idea, however specialized, but could be smaller and have three entries per side instead of two.