PetaPixel

Old Navy Follows in Gap’s Footsteps and Uses Photo without Permission

Last month we reported that a Flickr photographer had found his photograph of a car being used as a Gap clothing design without his permission. It now appears that appropriating images from the web wasn’t limited to that design, nor just the Gap brand — Old Navy, another brand owned by Gap, is now being accused of stealing a car photograph as well. A photographer was strolling around in an Old Navy store in El Centro, California when he came across a shirt that he just couldn’t stop staring at. It featured a Land Cruiser that look remarkably similar to one he had photographed before.

Here’s a comparison of the two images. Hover your mouse over to switch them:

Isaac contacted Gap asking for compensation and for them to cease and desist, and received a message from a lawyer asking him to contact them.


 
 
  • Victor Eleuterio

    again? man gap’s team sucks!

  • CJ

    I don’t think it is asking much to give the photographer a little $$ towards his work. I am sure Gap will make plenty on these shirts to cover the cost.

  • ScottM

    Watermark your stuff on Flickr, peeps!

  • Victor

    Watermarking pictures on Flickr won’t really do any good. If someone wants to use/steal your image – they will do it. I personally feel like a lot of photographers on Flickr over do it with these exuberant watermarks – so much that it over powers the image itself.

  • Ltdscott

    Frankly I’m most amazed that there’s an Old Navy in El Centro.

  • http://twitter.com/spine186 Nick Spinelli

    I wonder what licensing options they had set for their images. Also, whether they checked the box for Ghetty image usage.

  • http://twitter.com/spine186 Nick Spinelli

    I wonder what licensing options they had set for their images. Also, whether they checked the box for Ghetty image usage.

  • http://www.facebook.com/wingedpower Wing Wong

    Yet another reason to NOT use Flickr or other companies who have a vested interest in licensing away your images.

  • Jeevies

    Guaranteed that 95% of clothing brands that sell graphic tees have ripped off of a graphic. Some designers go into books to source a graphic to “trace.” Photoshop just makes it easier…

  • Matt

    I would rather my stuff just be easy to steal. I hate watermarking.

  • Jon

    Very good chance both were done by the same designer at the same time.

  • Budwardo

    The load on top it what gives it away.

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  • http://www.pixilstudio.com/info.html Bryangrant

    ive got an idea stop buying old navy ist a bunch of low quality crap anyway

  • http://www.pixilstudio.com/info.html Bryangrant

    ive got an idea stop buying old navy ist a bunch of low quality crap anyway

  • http://www.flickr.com/avaviel Avaviel

    How would watermarking stop someone from doing this?

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  • http://www.facebook.com/foxberry.studios Koke Momo

    Watermarking doesn’t do anything. With photoshop it can be easily removed. It’s rather pointless to do physical watermarks anymore.

  • http://twitter.com/cdevers Chris Devers

    I’m interested in getting in touch with “Isaac”, but we don’t have a full name, and the post on is by sparkplug, who just says “This is my friend that took this picture and it is also his truck. I don’t think he is a member here but I am sure he will drop in and take a look.”.

    My photo was the one that came up in February. Lawyers are involved, so I can’t be any more specific than that.

    Isaac & I probably ought to talk about this.

  • Anonymous

    The same can be said of any work with a copyright notice.  Ask why copyright notice is industry practice and you will learn that even though you own the copyright on any material you create, with or without the notice, you have an obligation to take reasonable action to enforce your copyright when infringement is found or by default you forfeit your copyright.  This is to prevent people from allowing their copyright to lapse, tacitly giving license for people to reuse your material, then trying to cash in on it once that material becomes widespread by suing people after the fact.  A watermark both prevents well-intentioned misuse of your work (somebody using it when they didn’t know where it really came from) as well as showing that you weren’t trying to copyright troll by putting the work out there under false or sloppy pretenses and then coming after people for money.