Posts Published in March 2011

Preserve Your Privacy by Pixelating Photographs with PhotoHide

Hiding or censoring part of an image through obfuscation is as easy as selecting the area in Photoshop and applying the Pixelate->Mosaic filter, but what if you don’t have an image editing program at your disposal? If you’re seriously paranoid about your privacy on the Internet, there’s a new service called PhotoHide that helps you quickly add these pixelated areas to any photo. Everything is done through the web browser, and you can download the final image once you’re done.

Doing this to every single photo of you on the Internet would be ridiculous, but you might find it useful for more reasonable applications (e.g. hiding your house or license plate number in a photo).

PhotoHide (via PhotographyBLOG)

Wooden Camera Case for the iPhone 4

Skins and cases that transform make the iPhone 4 look like a camera have become pretty popular in recent days, but this case by Etsy seller Signimade still manages to stand out. It’s crafted out of Bamboo, Zebra wood, or Walnut wood, and is made by hand. Each one costs $35.

SigniCASE (via Gizmodo)

Live Demo of Photoshop on the iPad

Adobe is working on a full version of Photoshop for the iPad for people who need more than the Photoshop Express app that’s more designed for mobile phones. At Photoshop World, which kicked off earlier this week, Adobe gave a neat demo of the app in action, and Eric Reagan over at Photography Bay recorded the video above. It’s a neat look at how they’re trying to rethink the popular program for a different kind of computer.

Photoshop for iPad Live Demo (via Photo Rumors)

General Electric Planning to Jump into Mirrorless Camera Market

We may soon see an unexpected player enter the mirrorless camera market: CNET Asia is reporting that GE will be introducing a mirrorless camera by the end of this year:

[...] GE is looking to introduce its first Micro Four Thirds-like camera before the end of 2011. While no other details were revealed, it is clear that the company is hoping to be treated more seriously as a camera-maker. And with GE’s strategy focused on producing affordable cameras, it will be interesting to see how it will change the ILC industry. For consumers, this may also mean that ILCs will finally hit mainstream prices.

General Electric-branded cameras first hit the market in March 2007, and are also known by the brand name “General Imaging”. Who knows… maybe in the future they’ll be one of the dominant players in the camera market.

(via Mirrorless Rumors)


Image credit: General Electric Automatic Iron Box by Marion Doss

Working 4×5 Camera Created with Lego

Photographer Cary Norton built a working 4×5 large format camera using Lego bricks, a 127mm lens he purchased for $40 on eBay, and a film holder and ground glass in the back.
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How CCD Sensors Are Manufactured

This Science Channel “How Its Made” segment shows the manufacturing process for CCD semiconductors, which are the sensors found in many digital cameras. For the difference between CCD and CMOS, check out this How Stuff Works article.

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Fancy Homemade Trigger Designed to Capture Lightning

IT consultant and photo enthusiast Viktor Takacs didn’t have much success when he tried capturing lightning on camera, so he decided to build this fancy do-it-yourself trigger (which he named “Zeus”) that automatically snaps a photo whenever the photodiode detects a flash of lightning. He even built a knob into the device that can be used to adjust sensitivity. The demo above shows the trigger reacting to manually triggered flashes from a strobe.

Takacs has a detailed post that walks through how he created the device. You can also email him for the code used by the microcontroller.

Zeus: Lightning Trigger for Cameras (via Hack a Day)

Build Your Own Working Cardboard Hasselblad Pinhole Camera

You can now build you own version of the cardboard Hasselblad pinhole camera that we featured a couple days ago. Kelly Angood has released a PDF with the template and detailed instructions for putting the pieces together. The finished product is a working pinhole camera that takes 120 35mm film.
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How Canon DSLR Cameras Work

Ever wonder what actually happens between the time you press the shutter button on a DSLR and when the image shows up on the LCD screen? Canon made these two videos explaining how their DSLR cameras work and how they use CMOS sensors to turn photons into photos. You’ll probably find this pretty interesting if you’ve never learned about CMOS sensors before. For a more in-depth lesson, check out the sensor tutorial over on Cambridge in Colour.

Historic Photo of Mercury Captured by NASA’s MESSENGER Probe

After a seven year journey that involved being slingshotted around the planets in our solar system, NASA’s MESSENGER probe entered Mercury’s orbit on March 17th, 2011. Yesterday the probe beamed back the first photograph ever taken of the planet from orbit (seen above).
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