Posts Published in November 2010

Portrait Lighting Using Only iPads

You’ve probably seen weird DIY light experiments before, but what about using only iPads as your main light sources? Photographer Jesse Rosten did just that, using 9 iPads (worth a cool $4,500) on maximum brightness on a recent photoshoot. On his blog, he writes,

Now before the haters start commenting let me first agree with you, yes, this is totally impractical (sidenote: most of my best ideas are often also my worst ideas). Nine iPads will set you back around $4,500. That amount of money can buy you a LOT of lumens in the form of a generic monobloc. This is not intended to be an exercise in excess, but rather a self-imposed limitation to help flex the creative muscles, and to make a point.

Think about it. One 60 watt bulb can put out more light that a truckload of iPads. And you don’t have to spend truckloads of cash to find a 60 watt. This whole making art thing is all about what you do with what you have. We just happened to have a bunch of iPads laying around so we went with that. Today’s dSLR sensors are sensitive enough that you could easily do this with some flashlights, headlights, headlamps, real lamps, or even – heaven forbid – real strobes! Now go forth and do!

Now we just sit back and wait for some copycat to try this idea with 81 iPod touches.

(via Videomaker)

Photographer Finds Work Used on Vehicle Inspection Stickers in Texas

A Texas-based photographer named David Langford received quite a surprise earlier this year when his friend tipped him off about a photo of his being used on vehicle registration inspection stickers in Texas. Turns out an estimated 4.5+ million stickers used a silhouette created from a photo of his from 1984 titled “Days End 2″. Langford is now suing the state to stop further use of his photo on the stickers — designed by prison inmates as part of a contract between the Department of Criminal Justice and the Department of Public Safety — and to collect damages and attorney fees.

Suit centers on silhouette cowboy (via The Online Photographer)

Print and Build Your Own Highly Detailed Paper Canon Cameras

Last year, Canon celebrated its 50th anniversary in manufacturing SLR cameras and released three super detailed paper craft cameras that you can print out and build yourself. These included the Canonflex, the AE-1, and the EOS 5D Mk II. Unless you have a good amount of time you can set aside for arts and crafts, this probably isn’t for you — each camera has dozens of pages of detailed instructions and a ton of tiny pieces that come together to form the final replica camera.
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First Digital Photograph Ever Made

Did you know that the first digital camera invented in 1975 didn’t actually produce the first digital photograph? The first digital photo actually came almost two decades earlier in 1957 when Russell Kirsch made a 176×176 pixel digital image by scanning a photograph of his three-month-old son. The low resolution was due to the fact that the computer they used wasn’t capable of storing more information.

(via Discovery News)

Star Wars Game Turns Real World into Battleground with iPhone Camera

As the cameras on mobile devices are used more and more for augmented reality applications, one thing we’ll undoubtedly see more of is augmented reality gaming, where the real world becomes part of the game. The above video shows some test footage of the upcoming game “Star Wars Arcade: Falcon Gunner”, which uses the camera on the iPhone (or iPod Touch) to turn real locations into places you need to defend from the Empire’s attack.

(via DailyMail)

Panasonic Unveils the Lumix DMC-GF2

Panasonic has just pulled the wraps off the Lumix DMC-GF2, the company’s smallest and lightest Micro Four Thirds camera. The cameras has a built in flash, employs a 3 inch touchscreen on the back, shoots stills at 12.1MP, captures 1920 x 1080 HD video, and has an ISO range of 100 to 6400. It’ll start shipping in January 2011, with the price secret until about a month before then.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Soviet Image Editing Tool from 1987

Three years before Photoshop 1.0 was released, computer engineers in the USSR were already retouching photographs using some surprisingly advanced technology. The video above shows how the Soviets went about restoring damaged images with the help of rotary scanners, magnetic tape, and trackballs.

(via Boing Boing)

DIY Small Softbox with Color Filters

Today I spent a couple of hours designing and making a simple box to fit directly onto a normal flash unit. I also made a couple of colored filters. After doing all this I thought I could share this with others and hopefully make them happy by doing so.
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Rapture: Another Epic Timelapse from Tom Lowe’s Upcoming Film

We’ve featured the amazing time-lapse work of Tom Lowe here before (see here and here), but here’s another sneak peek at his upcoming debut film titled “TimeScapes” that will drop your jaws. Stunningly beautiful.

(via Vincent Laforet)

HDR Photography Explained in a Diagram

Reddit user MacTuitui created this simple diagram (click to enlarge) explaining the idea behind HDR photography. The first low dynamic range (LDR) taken normally with a camera isn’t able to capture much of the detail found in the highlight and shadow areas of the scene. Two (or more) photographs are then taken at different exposure values to capture a wider range (the bracketing step) and subsequently combined into a single image with a high dynamic range (HDR). Since most displays aren’t capable of displaying this full range, the image needs to be tone mapped to have its appearance approximated on LDR screens.