PetaPixel

Sony A55 Named One of the 50 Best Inventions of 2010 by TIME

TIME magazine has named the Sony Alpha A55 as one of the top 50 inventions of 2010. They write,

A.K.A. the camera that never blinks. Traditional digital SLR cameras take the nicest photographs around, but they’re hobbled by a decades-old technical limitation: when you snap a picture, the mirror that’s been redirecting the image to your eye and to a focusing sensor pops up momentarily as the image is captured. Until it goes back down, the camera can’t focus. Sony’s Alpha A55 ($849.99 with lens) fixes that with an ingenious translucent mirror that stays put. That means you can shoot up to 10 perfectly focused photos a second and record HD video that never goes blurry. Bonus advantage: with no need to allocate interior space for a moving mirror, the Alpha is noticeably smaller and lighter than its Sony SLR brethren.

10 perfectly focused photos per second? That’s a pretty interesting claim.

Check out the full list of 50 inventions here.


 
  • Paul Grossmann

    Didn’t canon have a film camera with a similar mirror a decade or so ago?

  • Nikos D.

    This is why I don’t trust popular magazines/media reviews… :/

  • Guest

    The hard part about shooting with a Sony camera is telling your friends you’re gay.

  • Anonymous

    I’m having a hard time seeing what the problem with shutter blackout is, if I am in a situation with a lot of action and I need to know what happens next I’ll keep both eyes open to see what actually goes on outside of the viewfinder – a far bigger problem than black out, imo. Other than that between 40 and 80ms isn’t awful.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DKBNONKCA6F5WWX7T25UKQF62Q Anonymous

    Yes, Canon has had several cameras that use this. The Canon QL came out in 1965. Also know as a pellicle mirror. Here is my source http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/companies/canon/fdresources/pellix/ As you can see from the article Canon has used this in several cameras and Nikon has used it as well. I have also used a half silvered mirror in front of the lens at a 45 degree angle, you shoot through the mirror and then bounce a light off of the surface of the mirror. This way your light source can come from the exact angle as the lens. Helpful when shooting in a small hole. Mostly used in industrial photography. A customer brought a Canon QL in the camera store I worked in my younger days. I told him we would have to send it off because it was broke. My manage then came up and explained to me how the mirror worked in that camera.

  • Majestic Mind

    Not to mention the heating problem the pellicle mirrors have caused when shooting video. Sony ameliorated the situation by lamely saying, “Don’t take long videos”.

  • popmonkey

    canon had a pellicle mirror back in 1965…

  • Guest-H8er

    The hard part about not shooting with Sony is not having to tell your friends you’re gay. They just know :(

  • Petite_patineuse

    All I see is the Sony ASS; bad choice of numbers.

  • http://twitter.com/decemberjane December Jane M

    Santa is bringing me this camera – I can’t wait. Hell, I’d sleep with Santa if he’d bring it sooner!

  • Ashutosh Srv

    I dont why people are cribbing here about the flaws of this camera instead of going out and polishing ones photography skills. Pellicle slr and a55 share translucent mirror technology but similarity ends there. Former had problem with dark viewfinder since the users can only see a small portion of light which resulted in its failure. In a55 sony used EVF and thus eliminating the dark viewfinder problem and due to fixed mirror they can offer much higher FPS count than a tradition SLR whose FPS rate is generally limited due to mirror movement.

  • Paul Grossmann

    no one is cribbing about the flaws of this camera. I just dont think that the problem this camera solves (viewfinder blackout) was ever really that much of a problem, nor was its solution to that problem groundbreaking enough to be put on a list of best inventions of 2010. Ingenious translucent mirror? sounds a little like mirrored sunglasses to me, but i never saw a pair of Oakleys on any best inventions list.

  • Sonw Key

    The Sony SLT-A55V is a new video-capable DSLR from Sony that features Full HD recording and Sony’s new Translucent Mirror Technology. The camera did well in our video testing, but its lack of manual controls in video mode is a significant problem.This Article is about how to edit Sony A55 video on FCE,hope you like it.
    http://zyghrz.com/2010/11/best-sony-dslr-avchd-video-converter-convert-sony-a55-mts-files-to-final-cut/

  • Pingback: The Photo Follies 2010 Awards » The Russian Photos Blog

  • Jose Ch.

    Probalbly you are gay! The a55 is a terrific camara, with outstanding image quality.
    Your opinion ist based on prejudige meanings, without nowing how good this camara realy is.

  • Boowho

    c. o. o. l

  • Boowho

    what?

  • Guest

    your all fools

  • Nevalti

    1. For critically sharp macro pics you need a mirror lock-up to prevent microscopic camera shake. Very few cameras have this facility these days but the Sony A55 doesn’t need it.
    2. A ‘normal’ viewfinder gives you no indication of the contrast which will be recorded in , say, a contra jour shot. The EVF gives you a much better idea.
    3. With a small aperture lens many ‘normal’ viewfinders are too dim to see clearly. The Sony EVF automatically brightens to help you see properly.
    4. I prefer looking through a ‘normal’ viewfinder but I have to admit that the EVF is a more useful facility.
    5. Auto focus during filming is quite dreadful on Canon, Nikon, Olympus & Pentax cameras but near perfect on the Sony A55.

    So, sharper pictures, easier to use and far, far better video – professional quality even! Brand loyalty does not seem so sensible any more.

  • Phil Buckland

    “1. For critically sharp macro pics you need a mirror lock-up to prevent microscopic camera shake. Very few cameras have this facility these days but the Sony A55 doesn’t need it.”
    Unfortunately you’re wrong there :( I tried taking macro pictures of a fly specimen (100mm macro, 3 extension tubes) from a vertical photo rig. The mirror flip in the camera prevented any successful shots with this set up at long exposures.
    Luckily I could rearrange and put the camera on the table instead(!), but it was still a bit dissappointing that this lack of mirror lock-up will limit the cameras use in low-light situations.

  • Phil Buckland

    “1. For critically sharp macro pics you need a mirror lock-up to prevent microscopic camera shake. Very few cameras have this facility these days but the Sony A55 doesn’t need it.”
    Unfortunately you’re wrong there :( I tried taking macro pictures of a fly specimen (100mm macro, 3 extension tubes) from a vertical photo rig. The mirror flip in the camera prevented any successful shots with this set up at long exposures.
    Luckily I could rearrange and put the camera on the table instead(!), but it was still a bit dissappointing that this lack of mirror lock-up will limit the cameras use in low-light situations.