PetaPixel

TDK Unveils 1TB Optical Disc, Photogs in the Distant Future Rejoice

TDK has unveiled a monstrous 1 terabyte (1000 gigabyte) optical disc at CEATEC 2010 (the Japanese equivalent of CES), which wrapped up a couple days ago. The disc has 16 layers on both sides that each store 32GB of data, and is the equivalent to about 213 of the recordable DVD discs that you might be using to back up your image files. As someone who uses multiple external hard drives and countless DVD-Rs to backup my photos, I’d love to use these massive discs for backups and redundancy.

However, unlike improvements in hard drives, optical discs technologies can take forever to find their way to consumers — just look at how long it took Blu-ray to become the de-facto successor to the DVD. We can dream though, can’t we?

(via Engadget)


 
Get the hottest photo stories delivered to your inbox.
Get a daily digest of the latest headlines:
  • Anonymous

    Yikes! 1 TB on a single optical disk.
    Not me.

    With optical media failure rates and dubious longevity, TDK is going to have to guarantee archival gold standards and mission critical quality levels to make these marketable.
    In my experience, optical disk media is not suitable for archiving, has painfully slow access times compared to HD’s, slow write times requiring a dedicated burning app for proper session controls, and are highly vulnerable to physical damage from handling and environmental conditions.

    Since hard drives are so cheap, this media will only achieve low consumer adoption…which means the optical drive you’ll have to buy will remain quite expensive.

    Easier to get a BlacX drive toaster and a whack of hard drives.
    That’s the system I use…convenient, fast data transfer on eSATA, and no glitches to report.
    RIP optical media…at least for me. :D

  • Eric

    Can’t argue with @photosophy’s logic, but the proof of concept is what’s fascinating. We need companies to continue innovating in this way, whether or not every product becomes consumer-ready. As with the space program, value comes in unforeseen developments that originate in apparently impractical experiments.

  • Anonymous

    You have a point there about innovation.

    And, I just thought of a possible use for this…if burn times are relatively speedy.

    When I’ve given clients a copy of their entire video project (raw footage and all ~ .5 terabyte), I’ve usually given it to them on a hard drive.
    In certain cases, a single optical disk would have worked (since it was only for their back up), and would have cost a lot less in shipping.
    So, there could be some industry use/adoption as long as it’s robust.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1024085348 Dominick Delli Paoli

    I much rather use a thumb drive than a disc!

  • Freaky Born Wings

    hard drives all fail, it’s just a matter of when. especially for the motion picture industry, the search for long term archival storage continues…

  • Stuart Noah

    We are starting to see 3TB data sets.  So, if the burn time was fast enough, this might be a good medium for transferring data to outside research partners.  Otherwise, limited internet bandwidth forces us to transfer data over multiple sata hard drives.

  • Stuart Noah

    We are starting to see 3TB data sets.  So, if the burn time was fast enough, this might be a good medium for transferring data to outside research partners.  Otherwise, limited internet bandwidth forces us to transfer data over multiple sata hard drives.