PetaPixel

Walking the Sidewalks of NYC with Street Photographer Joe Wigfall

Joe Wigfall is a photo enthusiast and street photographer that won WNYC’s Street Shots Challenge back in 2008. This is the same contest that created the behind-the-scenes video featuring Bruce Gilden that became pretty popular on YouTube. As you’ll see, Wigfall’s approach towards street photograph is quite different from Gilden’s get-up-in-your-face approach.

Joe Wigfall can see with his hands. Never lifting his camera to his eye, he shoots hundreds of photos during his lunch hour or walking to the train after work. A true artist, Joe brings a bit of himself into each of his photographs.

You can follow Wigfall’s work through his Flickr stream. Other interview videos are available through WNYC’s Street Shots page.


 
  • Bas

    My hero… ;)

  • http://twitter.com/thelogomix The Logo Mix

    This was awesome.

  • http://twitter.com/thelogomix The Logo Mix

    This was awesome.

  • Pingback: Shooting From The Chest « CALIBER

  • http://www.facebook.com/f3lixp Félix Pagaimo

    That’s pretty much what i do! It’s awesome! Check my photostream at Flickr: f3lixlovesyou

    ;)

  • Guest

    So the guy basically takes hundreds of shots a day at his waist-level, and comes up with one or two ‘winners’ in the street photography capital of the world (NYC)? Most of the shots didn’t have any impact. He’s playing the percentage – not necessarily doing much with capturing what’s truly in front of him. Meh.

  • Guest

    So the guy basically takes hundreds of shots a day at his waist-level, and comes up with one or two ‘winners’ in the street photography capital of the world (NYC)? Most of the shots didn’t have any impact. He’s playing the percentage – not necessarily doing much with capturing what’s truly in front of him. Meh.

  • redhawk

    I have to agree with Winogrand. You cannot have any control over the framing if you’re not looking through the viewfinder. Regarding his comments about it “blinding you to what’s going on around you,” that’s why I choose to use a rangefinder. It’s designed to be shot with both eyes open to the world. He might get some keepers now and then but I can’t help but feel like there’s something cowardly and amateurish about shooting from the waist.

  • redhawk

    I have to agree with Winogrand. You cannot have any control over the framing if you’re not looking through the viewfinder. Regarding his comments about it “blinding you to what’s going on around you,” that’s why I choose to use a rangefinder. It’s designed to be shot with both eyes open to the world. He might get some keepers now and then but I can’t help but feel like there’s something cowardly and amateurish about shooting from the waist.

  • FotolifeRH

    Thanks for your honesty Joe, your right when you say that you can miss things when you put the camera to your face and you see first with your eyes so often capturing what you see is just a part of the process that can take part wether you put the camera to your face or not. You can always crop your photos later if you need to.