PetaPixel

What Makes a Great Photo, According to National Geographic

A great way to learn and become inspired is to look at great photographs. Even better is listening to experts discuss those images as you’re looking at them. The above video shows National Geographic editors picking their favorite photographs from their ongoing Your Shot contest and discussing why they feel the photo is so great.

The great pictures just stop time. They capture something that did not continue. It just was then, and that was the perfect moment. It wasn’t the moment before. It wasn’t the moment after. It was that moment.

Apologies if this video doesn’t load because you’re outside the US. If anyone knows a way around it for YouTube, feel free to share it with us in the comments.

(via Photoxels)


 
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  • http://www.facebook.com/andreas.puhl Andreas Puhl

    Just letting you know, im sitting in germany and the video played perfectly for me.

  • Peter van den Hamer

    The video also played here in Holland.

  • http://twitter.com/joakimfj Joakim Fjeldli

    Norway, same.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/jota_ce/ Tiago Dias

    In Portugal works fine as well.

  • Orlando Jr.

    Brazil here, its working here.

  • Zzpza

    Works in the UK too :)

    HCB would be proud.

  • Me

    Guess Ansel Adams would be out of luck, huh?

    PS The B&W photo stinks.

  • Geez

    the music was annoying.

  • Ron

    Japan: OK!

  • Risa

    I’m in the Philippines and the video played as well. Those shots were amazing. :)

  • Flickrman

    Working good in India too :)

  • Pingback: Award-Winning Photogs Discussing the Power of Photojournalism

  • Deepak

    In United Arab Emirates (Dubai) also its working.

  • Nikaalee

    also in Slovenia (:

  • dilian

    also in Dominican Republic :)

  • Anonymous

    Only once do they mention exposure as a factor. It’s clear that composition is key. You need to elicit emotion and reaction with your photography, otherwise, it’s just another picture. Getting a photograph technically right is important, but a lot can be forgiven if the subject shines.