PetaPixel

Strange Contact Sheet Self Portraits

Remember the contact sheet art we shared a while back? Photographer Karl Baden does something similar — he creates strange contact sheet self-portraits. These images were all created back in 1980. How a roll of film is exposed needs to be carefully planned out in order to know exactly where each shot will appear on the resulting contact sheet.

Each photo is a pretty normal shot of some area of Baden’s face or hands, but when combined into a contact sheet, the resulting image is quite… unique.

You can check out Baden’s other work on his blog.


Image credits: Photographs by Karl Baden and used with permission


 
  • http://twitter.com/chungdha Chung Dha Lam

    funny but also looks bit sick, but wonder if he just photoshop and cropped them or purposely shot it in the way to get those images.

  • Heythere

    look like aborted fetuses.

  • Xavierdjx

    it could be a nice idea before the digital Area… nothing says there is no photoshop, and if there is photoshop, the idea is just wind.

  • Karl Baden

    done in 1980. photoshop was not even a gleam in the eye of thomas knoll. all shot sequentially on one roll of film, printed as contact sheet. final versions for exhibition were printed by Gus Kayafas (Palm Press), doubleweight fiber mural paper, mounted on aluminum.

  • QuBe

    If Salvidor Dali saw these he would be compelled to ask for Karl Baden’s hand in marriage.
    :D

  • Karl Baden

    Chung Dha Lam, Xavierdjx and anyone else who thinks these pictures were digitally manipulated may be interested in viewing the negatives. I posted two of them here:
    http://s899.photobucket.com/albums/ac196/badenk/

  • Mistermajawa

    the negatives add a completely different way of seeing these creative works of art. i like them better, alas i am drawn to the darker side of things.

  • Tio

    What difference does it make whether they were manipulated in any way or not? There seems to exist some kind of widespread notion of photography as a pure project, or process, and then fake, low-class “photography”, which is the result of altering the image in whatever way. And the first type seems to be legitimate in the eyes of the many.
    I pity them for their ridiculous narrow-mindedness.
    The series are interesting. I would have liked them slightly more if the shots had been more technically balanced.