PetaPixel

Olympus Looking into Making Lens Shake a Useful Feature

Olympus recently filed a patent in Japan for a novel lens feature that shakes the front element in order to remove droplets of water.

Filters would obviously render the shaking feature useless on a DSLR system, but for a smaller compact camera designed to be waterproof and rugged, this feature would probably come in handy.

The patent also seems to indicate that the shaking would occur during autofocusing, so the lens would be cleared of water immediately before the camera exposes a shot.

What are your thoughts on this potential future feature?

(via Photo Rumors)


 
 
  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Quillan-Smith/100001335035948 Quillan Smith

    Sounds like it just might be a non practical frill.

  • Tim

    You’d have to shake the crap out of the front element to get water droplets off completely.

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    I think it would be something like the super-fast shaking/vibrating found in recent cameras that have dust-removal features.

  • http://twitter.com/LloydKBarnes Lloyd Barnes

    Maybe useful for underwater/waterproof cameras.

  • Fastactingrelief

    Most of those cameras license the dust removal technology from Olympus, because they hold the patent…

  • tsy87

    I don’t think any amount of shaking will get the water off your lens if it’s underwater….. *snickers*

    In all seriousness, I’m not so sure that it will be able to effectively remove enough water off the lens to make a difference… Either the water droplets wont effect the image quality at all, or it will have so much water that small amounts of shaking wont be able to get it off….

  • Eric

    I have no idea if this is something that I actually heard years ago or if I just made it up at the time, but I swear that when filming water scenes in the movie Cast Away they used some special rig to remove water from the lens. I think that it was some type of rotating filter that went in front of the lens that would spin the water drops off of the camera lens when the camera was splashed. Not sure if this was a real invention, or if I just made up the idea after watching the film years ago.