PetaPixel

Scientific Curiosity Captured in Photos

Caleb Charland is a Maine-based photographer who combines a love of scientific experiments and photographs into wonderful and amazing photographs. If Isaac Newton or Benjamin Franklin were into photography, their photographs might look something like these:

“Wooden Box with Horseshoe Magnet”

“Atomic Model”

“Demonstration with Hair Dryer and Aluminum Foil”

“Candle in a Vortex of Water”

“Fifteen Hours”

Regarding his work, Charland tells us,

Wonder is a state of mind somewhere between knowledge and uncertainty. It is the basis of my practice and results in images that are simultaneously familiar and strange. I utilize everyday objects and fundamental forces to illustrate experiences of wonder. Each photograph begins with a simple question “How would this look? Is that possible? What would happen if…?” and develops through a sculptural process of experimentation. As I explore the garage and search through the basement to solve these pictures, I find ways to exploit the mysterious qualities of these everyday objects and familiar materials.

To check out more of his work, you can visit his website.


Image credits: Photographs by Caleb Charland and used with permission.


 
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  • http://www.facebook.com/rumata Ivan Cabrera Escalante

    Absolutely stuning photos and creative concept, love it!

  • nortonzanini

    This is soo captivating, I loved it

  • DM|ZE

    Very cool, I really like the first and last ones.

  • michaelpote

    Interesting in the last picture that the candle's height decreases almost logarithmically instead of linearly with time, as you'd expect..

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  • noflyzone44

    Looks like a taper. Oughta burn faster at first. Less fuel.

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    So if the candle were uniform in circumference from top to bottom it would probably be linear. Interesting…

  • egoipsissimus

    reflectively . according to it awesome.

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • Name

    cuz the candle is smaller in diameter at the top!

  • calebcharland

    Hello, thanks for writing about my work. The candle tapers toward the top so there is less wax at the top of the candle than at the bottom. Thus it burns down further near the top than near the base

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  • http://spot.bz/ Phyza

    I loved the first and last one.. That last one is really cool. I just felt it as some haunted piece of art :D Awesome photos
    Thanks
    PHYza

  • jackieizso

    Where in Maine do you come from?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Chris-Menges/100000204874403 Chris Menges

    Wow that is something I want to do!

  • http://www.electroniccigarettesinc.com e cigarette

    Some really cool stuff

  • smdimi

    images one couldnt imagine ever viewing. thank you for the experience. where can one buy prints?

  • Ben

    Freak'n Awesom

  • whiteboard

    good work friend….i like the firsrt one…

  • himachalhotels

    lovely pictures, i must say what a great post.

  • KKrovvidi

    simply scintillating photography, brilliant ideas. Congrats

  • ahmetoskay

    Müthiş düşünceler.Teşekkürler.
    asoskay

  • http://bsimeltingpot.blogspot.com/ stella

    There's a hidden string in every object, awaken it with the right tune and wonder will shine through.

  • http://gtoosphere.blogspot.com/ g2

    Wow!

  • fernanda123

    Absolutely amazing! Could you please explain “Atomic Model” and “Candle in a Vortex of Water”?

  • danzon09

    we do agree, my daughters (6 and 9) and myself. They love to play with “stuff” and this has given them IDEAS (should I worry?)

  • http://swantron.com/ swiz

    nice pics…magnetism has some sort of creepy quality about it

  • moonlight_melody

    Amazing photos.

  • DamienSpencerStudios

    These images are very inspirational. You have sparked my imagination. And as Ivan said Absolutely stunning photos.

  • ishrikrishna

    Great Man,
    Very Amazing, great show piece.

  • Durga

    Amazing pictures

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  • http://twitter.com/stilusmen StilusBiz

    nice pics…magnetism about it

  • Keiko

    Stumbled upon this… I'm reminded of George Johnson's “The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments” – reading it right now. Stunning works.

  • http://gigjets.com/ Swapnil

    Wow! this is simply brilliant! Especially the candle one!

  • tekxy

    Amazing images you got there, brilliant.

  • jackbetall

    No way man. let them learn, its good. all you need to do is teach them that they can do experiments, just make sure they know the safety that comes with it. you can definitely make it fun, which i believe is a very easy tool to help learning. and its not just going in one ear and out the other, this teaching style is remembered. its like called being a good parent. you know what to do.