PetaPixel

Build Your Photo Business with Nickels

Here’s an idea for those of you who are looking for photography clients of any kind: Offer portraits and other kinds of photographs at your local farmers market for a nickel.

In the above video by Michael Hanson for the NYTimes, architect John Morefield describes how he offers architecture advice at his local farmers market for a nickel. While a whole day of doing this might net less than a dollar, Hanson found 100% of his work for a year using this creative way to connect with potential clients.

Photographers might be able to do the same thing. Why not set up a booth in your local farmers market and offer portraits or photography help/advice for 5 cents? You could take down email addresses, pass out business cards, and later email photographs to your nickel “clients”. If 5 cents would create too much work in terms of emailing photographs, you could increase the price or tweak the strategy to your liking.

(via A Photo Editor)


 
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  • http://www.stfoto.nl/ Steven

    I really like this idea. I might just do this some time. Thanks a lot!! :)

    The way I did it was advertise at social networking sites with photoshoots for 10 euro's or 20 in studio. It generated lot's of contacts who eventually asked me for bigger assignments.

    Works as a charm!

  • http://www.Talenttrove.com/ Robert_M

    That's Actually pretty clever. The 5 cent gimmick is enough for people to remember you by if they ever need your services.

  • smilingbluedog

    What a unique concept!
    Thanks for sharing :)

  • http://twitter.com/tmueller73 Tony Mueller

    I like how his booth looks just like Lucy's from the Peanuts cartoons.

  • http://www.petapixel.com Michael Zhang

    Ooh. Interesting observation…

    Lucy's “psychiatric help” is 5 cents as well. I guess we know now where he got the idea from :-)

  • http://freephotoproject.tumblr.com/ Iain

    The problem is that people like to look their best for photos, and lots of people don't like photographs of themselves. The architecture advice requires nothing from the person seeking the advice. With photography is not the same.

    I have been doing something similar for three years, purely for the fun of it (http://freephotoproject.tumblr.com/) and I have found that the people who most want photos for free are the ones who can't afford to hire me. That is, young people, typically students. I do not do it at a farmers market, but I have tried a number of different situations. Nevertheless, it has generated some work, it is a lot of fun, and I have learned a lot.

  • http://www.WilsonDavalos.com/ Wilson Davalos

    I’ve actually have been doing this at the Farmers Market at Union Square. People
    have been really open to me taking a portrait. I just set up a white seamless
    backdrop, and I’m good to go.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wilsondavalos/sets/72157622785942448/

  • http://www.WilsonDavalos.com Wilson Davalos

    I’ve actually have been doing this at the Farmers Market at Union Square. People
    have been really open to me taking a portrait. I just set up a white seamless
    backdrop, and I’m good to go.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wilsondavalos/sets/72157622785942448/

  • http://virtualphotographystudio.com/ Lori Osterberg

    Great idea. Why not make it a Facebook photo for a buck? You have to get their contact information in order to send them their image – and from there you can market in a variety of ways.

    The idea isn't to make money with this idea upfront – its to build your list of contacts. People at farmers markets usually have more money, so its a great way to meet people that may need your services.

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